Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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#1851213
Having been challenged on my interpretation of the French exemption on historic aircraft, I am withdrawing my claim that the
that 1.2 and 1.3 are alternatives to 1.1. It seems all three conditions must be complied with.

Sorry KP.

This is disappointing, because under this decree, until 18 January 2018, all LAA PtF factory built aircraft were exempt.

https://www.legifrance.gouv.fr/jorf/id/ ... 0025413653
#1851313
@patowalker, I'm trying to stitch this all together. My reading (so far) is that this document:

https://www.ecologie.gouv.fr/sites/defa ... crafts.pdf

... confirms that Annex II (so now Annex I) aircraft can fly in France without any extra permissions. So far, so good.

And this document:

https://www.ecologie.gouv.fr/sites/defa ... 07Rev3.pdf

... states that the DGAC considers that all aircraft listed (which, inter alia, includes Jodel DR1050) meet the criteria for Annex II (so now Annex I).

Therefore, Jodel DR1050s can fly in France on a temporary basis. Debate.
#1851340
C'est compliqué tout ça, mon vieux.

The French decree, dated 2003, states that orphan CofA aircraft, designed more than 40 years ago and whose production ended more than 25 years ago, are eligible for a CDNR. That is a moving target, while EASA has used fixed dates. I also believe that "conception d'origine" is a more flexible term than "initial design", and that may also have influenced the French interpretation of when the DR1050 concept originated.

https://www.legifrance.gouv.fr/loda/id/ ... 000612889/

So, it seems to me that, true to form, the French have looked after their own and agreed a list of aircraft with EASA, which may, or may not, strictly comply with Annex 1. I think it can be assumed that an aircraft on that list, registered in the UK, is covered by the exemption.

If you want want me to ask the DGAC if the DR1050 is covered, I'll be pleased to do so, but you have to be prepared to take no for an answer.
#1851345
patowalker wrote:If you want want me to ask the DGAC if the DR1050 is covered, I'll be pleased to do so, but you have to be prepared to take no for an answer.


While you're about it could you ask about an RF-3, please? (On a UK Permit.)
#1851349
patowalker wrote:C'est compliqué tout ça, mon vieux.

The French decree, dated 2003, states that orphan CofA aircraft, designed more than 40 years ago and whose production ended more than 25 years ago, are eligible for a CDNR. That is a moving target, while EASA has used fixed dates.


This went back quite a few years when the DGAC dumped a lot of types for which they were the TC holder.

At that time the DR200 series were also going to be orphaned, but then this was reversed before they could be accepted by the LAA. There was a lot of hoohaa about whether the 40 years was a fixed date or a rolling period.

But it doesn't matter for us - if there is a willing TC holder, then you stay on CofA
#1851396
patowalker wrote:
nallen wrote:While you're about it could you ask about an RF-3, please? (On a UK Permit.)

The RF-3 is not on the list. I would have to have a good reason to ask. Do you know of one?


I was going to ask on the basis of >40-year-old design, out of production for >25 years, no type certificate holder … however, I got an email yesterday (!) that there is a new TC holder, so I guess that knocks that idea on the head. (I have no idea how the UK RF-3s - and some, but not all, RF-4s - ended up on a Permit…)
#1852222
patowalker wrote:KP,

We've cracked it. See this list published by EASA.

Bons vols.


Excellent find patowalker, thanks. Nice to see that the pragmatic DGAC (as EASA says it was steered by the NAAs) agrees with me about the DR1050 being 'merely' a development of the D11 :D

That file has been carefully filed for future use.
Dave W, patowalker liked this
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