Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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#1838233
Here is the news we have been waiting for.

https://www.legifrance.gouv.fr/jorf/id/ ... 0043328559

France has added the UK to the list of countries covered by:

Amateur built aircraft, registered in a European Economic Area member State or in Switzerland, are allowed to overfly the French territory without prior validation of their airworthiness document for a duration not exceeding 28 consecutive days in any one visit

and
Historic aircraft, registered in an European Economic Area member State or in Switzerland, are allowed to overfly the French territory without prior validation of their airworthiness document for a duration not exceeding 28 consecutive days in any one visit
kanga liked this
#1838259
Are we sure about this?

From the UK Govt website with todays date
Countries in the EU and EEA
The European Union (EU) is an economic and political union of 27 countries. It operates an internal (or single) market which allows free movement of goods, capital, services and people between member states.

EU countries
The EU countries are:

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Republic of Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain and Sweden.

The European Economic Area (EEA)
The EEA includes EU countries and also Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. It allows them to be part of the EU’s single market.

Switzerland is not an EU or EEA member but is part of the single market. This means Swiss nationals have the same rights to live and work in the UK as other EEA nationals.


So as "UK" isn't mentioned here I don't think we're in the EEA. Sorry :(
#1838265
It does indeed

et immatriculés dans un Etat partie à l'accord sur l'Espace économique européen, en Suisse ou au Royaume-Uni sont autorisés à survoler temporairement le territoire français


Rob P
Dave W liked this
#1838271
Dodo wrote:Will that be covered by this regulation?

Not this one, no.

I don't think anything has changed there since the pre-Brexit position. As described in the LAA Tech Leaflet:

LAA TL2.08 wrote:Factory built PtF Aircraft and those Amateur Build Aircraft not covered by a ruling
(Arrêté) the position is:
In order to obtain an individual permit to fly in France, pilots need to send to DGAC at the
following email address: lpaviationgenerale <at> aviation-civile<dot>gouv<dot>fr, or by fax
(+33.1.58.09.43.47)
- Completed DGAC Form LP6
- Copy of the National permit to fly
- Copy of the National certificate of validity
- Proof of payment of the 50€ civil aviation fee (this payment can be done directly on their
website)
Questions regarding this, please contact them directly at the same email address: lpaviationgenerale <at> aviation-civile<dot>gouv<dot>fr
Dodo liked this
#1838316
Peter Gristwood wrote:All we need now is recognition of the LAPL


The LAPL is recognised for flying in home-built and certain historic aircraft, but not Part 21 aircraft. :)

The pilot shall hold a pilot’s licence and associated qualifications entitling him to fly this
aircraft, issued either by the State of registration or an organisation with a delegation by the
said State, or validated or accepted by the said State
#1838365
patowalker wrote:
Peter Gristwood wrote:All we need now is recognition of the LAPL


The LAPL is recognised for flying in home-built and certain historic aircraft, but not Part 21 aircraft. :)

The pilot shall hold a pilot’s licence and associated qualifications entitling him to fly this
aircraft, issued either by the State of registration or an organisation with a delegation by the
said State, or validated or accepted by the said State


I don't think that's quite right - AIUI a LAPL is recognised for flying both Part 21 and non Part 21 aircraft in the UK and nothing at all outside of UK airspace.
#1838373
The wording is similar to that which applies to microlights.

il est titulaire d'un titre permettant de voler sur cet ULM soit délivré par cet Etat ou par un organisme ayant reçu délégation de cet Etat, soit validé ou reconnu par cet Etat


Le pilote est titulaire d'un titre aéronautique et des qualifications associées permettant de voler sur cet aéronef, soit délivré par l'Etat d'immatriculation ou par un organisme ayant reçu délégation de cet Etat, soit validé ou reconnu par cet Etat.


UK microlight pilots have been flying to France for years based on that wording. It must refer to sub-ICAO licences, because it mentions licences issued by a State or delegated authority. The BMMA issues microlight licences.

Why would there be any need to mention the licence, if it had to be ICAO compliant?
G-BLEW, russp liked this
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