Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
#1838376
Dave W wrote:
Dodo wrote:Will that be covered by this regulation?

Not this one, no.

I don't think anything has changed there since the pre-Brexit position. As described in the LAA Tech Leaflet:
[/quote]

Isn't the Bolkow an 'older aircraft 'covered by:-
"Thus, for amateur-built aircraft and certain older aircraft registered in the United Kingdom, the exemption from prior request to the French authorities to validate their airworthiness document which is not at the ICAO level no longer applies. This decree reinstates this facilitative provision for such aircraft registered in the United Kingdom.
Dodo liked this
#1838378
patowalker wrote:The wording is similar to that which applies to microlights.

il est titulaire d'un titre permettant de voler sur cet ULM soit délivré par cet Etat ou par un organisme ayant reçu délégation de cet Etat, soit validé ou reconnu par cet Etat


Le pilote est titulaire d'un titre aéronautique et des qualifications associées permettant de voler sur cet aéronef, soit délivré par l'Etat d'immatriculation ou par un organisme ayant reçu délégation de cet Etat, soit validé ou reconnu par cet Etat.


UK microlight pilots have been flying to France for years based on that wording. It must refer to sub-ICAO licences, because it mentions licences issued by a State or delegated authority. The BMMA issues microlight licences.

Why would there be any need to mention the licence, if it had to be ICAO compliant?


That's encouraging and I don't see a flaw in your logic, hopefully the LAA et al will confirm this at some point.
#1838387
The French exemption refers to Annex 1 1. a. (i)

1. Categories of manned aircraft to which this Regulation does not apply:
(a) historic aircraft meeting the following criteria:
(i) aircraft whose:
— initial design was established before 1 January 1955, and
— production has been stopped before 1 January 1975;
Last edited by patowalker on Mon Apr 05, 2021 10:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Dave W liked this
#1839094
Penny has just dropped! I've been trying to find out what happened to the French Recognition of UK-NPPL licence for flying in France.

http://www.lightaircraftassociation.co.uk/2010/LAA%20Home%20Page/NPPL/AIC_A_2010_13_EN-4.pdf

Just realised Article 4 of January 8, 2018 order (which remains extant under Order of April 1, 2021) embraces NPPL and by my reading LAPL too. I'd be happy to go on that without asking DGAC.

Well done to those who have progressed this post Brexit.
#1839133
We need official confirmation.
The CAA have said a UK issued LAPL is now, post Brexit, 'UK only'.
So until someone, i.e. DGAC, CAA, LAA, says we can fly in the EU with a UK issued LAPL and LAPL medical (without Class2 medical)I think the risk of getting ramp checked in France and the subsequent concequences of not being able to fly back home are too great.
So for now my aeroplane can go to France but me without Class 2 medical can't! :(
#1839168
@Shoestring Flyer Well if you are going to ask, don't do it as "can I..." as that has a large "No" hit rate. Explain/quote the French regulations, your conclusion, and say "that is correct isn't it?"
Paul_Sengupta liked this
#1839189
Shoestring Flyer wrote:Just caught up with last nights Flyer youtube and it was discussed briefly there.
I had sort of forgotten that it was actually EASA that said that a UK issued LAPL was not valid in the EU.


Of course EASA only regulate certified Part 21 aircraft so presumably don't have authority over homebuilds and vintage permit aircraft, that's down to the individual countries so the fact that EASA said a LAPL isn't valid only means it isn't valid to fly Part 21 aircraft? They don't (as far as I can tell) have the authority to declared it invalid for aircraft that are the responsibility of the individual countries aviation authorities?
#1839204
Shoestring Flyer wrote:Just caught up with last nights Flyer youtube and it was discussed briefly there.
I had sort of forgotten that it was actually EASA that said that a UK issued LAPL was not valid in the EU.


EASA did not say it was not valid in the EU. All they did was refuse to get involved with validating a third country sub-ICAO licence. Seems perfectly logical to me. Anybody who expected EASA to validate it must have been dreaming.