Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
By andytk58
#1838024
Also, am I the only person that routinely carries smoke flares?

As I flew/fly in Scotland much of the terrain isn't friendly and I used to cross water as a matter of routine I always figured an engine failure was going to result in the attendance of the SAR Helo, so to improve my chances I have 2 waterproof smoke flares. These stay in the bag that comes out the door with me in the event of a ditching. Also lifejackets worn over any water.

If you're bobbing in the sea without any means of communication (assuming you've got a call into D&D on the way down) then flares massively improve your chances of getting recovered.

Even a forced landing on mountain terrain, assuming you survive I figured they would be of use.

Andy
#1838032
Trent772 wrote:Long water crossings only require T shirt and shorts, a bottle of Talisker and a loaded 9mm pistol...... :pirat:

You say that so often I'm beginning to believe it is true. :lol:

@andytk58 I carry a PLB for that purpose, although whether once in the water one's fingers and arms would have the power to active either a PLB or flare is another question. :wink:

Interestingly I recall an incident when kayaking. There were 7 of us when the weather blew up. Short story is 4 of us got ashore leaving 3 at sea, two trying to help the third, which turned in to one trying to help 2. The one couldn't manage and had to leave them (one being his wife) to go for help. He called the heli I posted a pic of yesterday, meanwhile his wife and the other fella had been washed up on rocks. The older fella now suffering from mild hypothermia just watched as the heli went up and down the loch looking for them. I was able to attract their attention and advise when he landed that there were 3 unaccounted for. I watched them searching for a while, meanwhile on the opposite shore in the rocks the lady was trying desperately to convince the hypothermic fella to use the flares to let the SAR team know where they were. She failed. :roll: All was well in the end, they eventually found them.

That particular lady has had 2 trips in that heli. :lol:
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By PeteSpencer
#1838034
I don’t routinely carry flares as to store them in the hangar invalidates its insurance. So stored at home and carried only when long overwater flight contemplated :wink:
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By Trent772
#1838039
Miscellaneous wrote:
Trent772 wrote:Long water crossings only require T shirt and shorts, a bottle of Talisker and a loaded 9mm pistol...... :pirat:

You say that so often I'm beginning to believe it is true. :lol:


Up to 2 hours in the RV7 I would dress normally.

Above 2 hours, I would take scheduled airline :mrgreen:

I have spent thousands of hours sat over arctic and ocean airspace on 2 engines - always been a pleasure to stare at the scenery !

Some years ago, a group of Icelandic guys came down to Breighton. Pitts Model 12, RV7 and another type. I said what did you do for the crossing ?

They said a flask and sandwiches - we are all retired from the airlines and if it is our time, then it is so.....

They were a great group of chaps who we enjoyed beer with !

Opinions vary, you take what you are happy with. I hope to cross the pond again in the next couple of years and it will be in a single turbine.
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By Dave W
#1838042
Miscellaneous wrote:...meanwhile on the opposite shore in the rocks the lady was trying desperately to convince the hypothermic fella to use the flares to let the SAR team know where they were. She failed. :roll:

Why wouldn't he? :shock:

Why couldn't she?

For the OP; Hat, spare goggles, tablet, SE2, headset, batteries. That's really it.

Safety stuff if overwater/remote areas.

I have loads of other stuff. It never gets used.
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By Rob P
#1838053
Trent772 wrote:Opinions vary, you take what you are happy with.


Of course they do

For me? Wick to Reykjavik in an SEP I didn't even to bother with a lifejacket. At my stage of life, why would you?

Rob P
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#1838055
Dave W wrote:Why wouldn't he? :shock:

Put down to the onset of hypothermia, a symptom of which is confusion.

Dave W wrote:Why couldn't she?

He was an instructor, she was relatively new. He had them in his possession. She was the one who had been in trouble. She is not slow at dealing with such situations, maybe she would eventually have taken them from him?

It's surprising how things don't always go as planned/expected/they should. :wink:

Rob P wrote:At my stage of life, why would you?

To increase the chances of recovering your body and allowing a speedy closure for MrsP? :thumright:

To increase the chances of the emergency services finding you and not potentially spending days searching? :wink:
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By Rob P
#1838057
Miscellaneous wrote:To increase the chances of the emergency services finding you and not potentially spending days searching?


I fear I am not that altruistic.

My companions, far younger than I, were in survival suits and all the rest. I left it to them to tell the chopper-chaps that I had undoubtedly passed on.

As I have frequently commented on here, I fail to see what is so enticing about lying in a hospice while a pretty nurse changes my pee bag.

Robb P
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By Iceman
#1838083
JodelDavo wrote:Seriously, has anyone who has a non-commercial licence EVER been pulled up by the CAA in the UK for not carrying their licence?


Yes, I’ve been ramp checked twice by the CAA (both times were at Badminton) and on the first of those occasions, unusually, I didn’t have my licence with me (I had decided not to bring my normal heavy flight case due W&B). They had a few words in my ear hole about my lack of licence carriage :roll:.

Iceman 8)
#1838087
Paul_Sengupta wrote:Blimey. Were you in the Scouts or Guides...?

Brownies, does that count?
When you live on a small island every flight is over (fairly hostile) water. I only wear the immersion suit when heading out to Iceland in a single.................
Owning your own aircraft means you can carry all sorts if “stuff” that you wouldn’t bother with if you had to take it to the aircraft every trip.
When taking pax I add sick bags and those little cans of gin and tonic to the stores; quinine is quite good for motion sickness and a nip of gin relaxes people :lol: 8)
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By Gasbag
#1838102
I was going to put “Polos” but Mr Peare beat me to it!
On a tricky approach or potentially tricky landing, there is nothing as good as a polo tucked into the side of the mouth to get rid of that dry croaky “final” call.
I’ve often wondered about the necessity of a 20kg flight bag carried out for a couple of currency circuits........
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