Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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#1818860
I've not come across any maintenance companies that have closed down. All those within an hour of me are remaining open and happy for me to fly in if needs be.

The one that did my last check have remained open throughout the last twelve months but have to close on Fridays to allow the germs to die for 72 hours (C19 'elf and saiftee innit' apparently).
Last edited by BoeingBoy on Sat Jan 09, 2021 11:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
#1819023
2Donkeys wrote:I've just this morning moved my aircraft from Cambridge to Little Staughton - which will be its new home. The 'excuse' for the flight was maintenance (some is immediately required), but as others have written here, both Cambridge and IAE (the operators of Little Staughton) were happy for the flight to go ahead and so was I.

I am comfortable defending it should anybody feel that it infringes any rules!


I'm taking Covid very seriously, and support the measures being taken, but I think this is entirely within both the letter and spirit of the law.

Reasonable excuses for leaving home include accessing a service (though that list is non-exhaustive). Aircraft maintenance is a service. So it's within the letter of the law. And it can be done in a way that doesn't generate any significant risk, so it's within the spirit of the law.

I plan to do the same thing for our aircraft when it comes up to its annual.

Paul
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By gasman
#1819029
BoeingBoy wrote:The one that did my last check have remained open throughout the last twelve months but have to close on Fridays to allow the germs to die for 72 hours (C19 'elf and 'sarftee' apparently).


I would be very interested to review the scientific evidence used to support that decision.
:?:
#1819036
My Continental O-200 hasn't turned since 7th October 2020. The strip is waterlogged as usual with March likely to be the earliest it will be useable, meaning 5 months of inactivity.

I can't even get the a/c out to ground run as it's at the back of the hangar and it takes two or three people to extract it.

Best I can do will be to change the oil before use.
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#1819056
Our arrer has flown regularly at wideish intervals (sadly not with me in it ) and a month is up in ten days . So it will get a flight to maint to fix some snags and a month after that it’s the annual The car COVID/logistics are fulfilled by our spouses . :wink:

Airstrip as always is flyable all year round .( no snow @ present)
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#1819068
PaulisHome wrote:
2Donkeys wrote:I've just this morning moved my aircraft from Cambridge to Little Staughton - which will be its new home. The 'excuse' for the flight was maintenance (some is immediately required), but as others have written here, both Cambridge and IAE (the operators of Little Staughton) were happy for the flight to go ahead and so was I.

I am comfortable defending it should anybody feel that it infringes any rules!


I'm taking Covid very seriously, and support the measures being taken, but I think this is entirely within both the letter and spirit of the law.

Paul


The law says stay at home, other than for reasonable ‘excuses’ non of which includes GA.

The governments guidance for GA is this:

Permitted GA activities
GA flying is permitted for the purposes of work, where it is not reasonably possible to work or provide those services at home. Social distancing measures must be in place and observed at all times.

Flying training organisations providing training for professional pilots, for the purposes of work, may continue to do so. Individuals undertaking such activity may continue to attend for these purposes. Social distancing measures must be in place and observed at all times.

Engine health and maintenance check flights can only take place where there is a critical safety requirement to do so, and alternative options are not available. Such flights, where conducted, must be kept to the minimum duration possible and should land at the same airfield from which they departed, except where this is outside the reasonable control of the pilot.


How can there be a “critical safety requirement” when hobby pilots and their toys aren’t even supposed to be flying?

An “alternative option” IS available: Leave it in the hangar for a while.
#1819082
PeteSpencer wrote:Our arrer has flown regularly at wideish intervals (sadly not with me in it ) and a month is up in ten days . So it will get a flight to maint to fix some snags and a month after that it’s the annual The car COVID/logistics are fulfilled by our spouses . :wink:

Airstrip as always is flyable all year round .( no snow @ present)

Why not leave the snags until the Annual?
#1819084
malcolmfrost wrote:
PeteSpencer wrote:Our arrer has flown regularly at wideish intervals (sadly not with me in it ) and a month is up in ten days . So it will get a flight to maint to fix some snags and a month after that it’s the annual The car COVID/logistics are fulfilled by our spouses . :wink:

Airstrip as always is flyable all year round .( no snow @ present)

Why not leave the snags until the Annual?


I lied :The annual is in April

Rust won’t wait

I have a sneaky suspicion this forum will turn into a band of FR24 dobbers :roll:
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#1819093
How can there be a “critical safety requirement” when hobby pilots and their toys aren’t even supposed to be flying?


Because the DfT have acknowledged that the principle of engine health flights is a valid cause. It was in the first lock down (eventually) and has been since.

Lycoming make it clear that if the engine is not inhibited it should (must) be flown for one hour per 30 days. (SL180b). Proximity to moisture and salt air makes the situation worse.

To put that into context my aircraft sat at Bournmouth from October 15 to February 16 at the hands of a company that said it would only be there two weeks! When I got it back I was forced by a weather window to start it in -7c to get it home.

Come the annual in April, lo and behold all four cylinders were shot with corrosion and scoring. One of those could have failed causing a forced landing. As it was the result was £10k for a top overhaul. How much more critical do you want to get?

I agree we need to do our part, but I am not going to risk sitting in a field at best or paying out another £10k when the DfT make it clear they acknowledge that engines must stay in an airworthy condition.
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By peter272
#1819102
Sadly, for this lockdown at least, the engine health flights aren't allowed for 'leisure pilots'. If it starts to drift towards March, that may well change.

I wonder if we could sort a group action against the DfT for any loss or damage as a result of their instruction. Replacing a set of cylinders isn't cheap, and it's not our fault we can't run the engine as per the maintenace schedules.

Perhaps a grant of £10k per aircraft....? :lol:
#1819107
£10k might not be enough. Better make it a grant for the factory list price for a brand new engine and labour.

That might help commercial use with a 12 year engine life limit (if that still exists now we have left EASA).
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