Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By Peter Gristwood
#1818085
Here we are again, this time probably until early March, by all accounts.

Is there any chance of the exemption we had last year for engine health? Seems that each of the lockdowns has different rules, and lessons learned from one aren't carried over to the next.
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By Rob P
#1818086
Dear God! Cue another 12 page circular discussion coming up.

Do it if your airfield will let you, don't if they won't.

Rob P
lobstaboy, skydriller, JAFO and 4 others liked this
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By lobstaboy
#1818091
Rob P wrote:Dear God! Cue another 30 page circular discussion.

Do it if your airfield will let you, don't if they won't.

Rob P


You also need to check that your engine handbook/manufacturers guidance requires an engine health flight.
As examples: Lycoming does (so you can do it), Rotax doesn't (so you can't).
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By Rob P
#1818092
CloudHound wrote:Academic for those of us with waterlogged runways. :(


I guess that falls under "Your airfield won't let you"? :lol:
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By skydriller
#1818101
lobstaboy wrote:You also need to check that your engine handbook/manufacturers guidance requires an engine health flight.
As examples: Lycoming does (so you can do it), Rotax doesn't (so you can't).


And this changes things how exactly? We've had all these discussions before. I dont own an aeroplane, but if I did I know what I would do.

At the end of the day, you choose to go flying or you choose not to go flying in the same way as you choose to do anything in life. Some may or may not wish to break rules or laws under any circumstances. Some may believe that their safety is better served flying an aeroplane than not flying an aeroplane, or vice- versa.

Where I am we can fly solo but have had alot of rain and our aerodrome is Notamed closed, however as soon as it is open, I shall fly go flying - I last flew a couple of weeks ago, so an extra week is not a big deal.

Regards, SD..
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By JodelDavo
#1818104
lobstaboy wrote:You also need to check that your engine handbook/manufacturers guidance requires an engine health flight.
As examples: Lycoming does (so you can do it), Rotax doesn't (so you can't).


What difference does it make? High humidity and corrosion don’t really care what the manual says. I’m sure as hell going to be flying my aeroplane if I want to, and the rules allow.
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By lobstaboy
#1818108
JodelDavo wrote:
lobstaboy wrote:You also need to check that your engine handbook/manufacturers guidance requires an engine health flight.
As examples: Lycoming does (so you can do it), Rotax doesn't (so you can't).


What difference does it make? High humidity and corrosion don’t really care what the manual says. I’m sure as hell going to be flying my aeroplane if I want to, and the rules allow.


Because that's what the engine health flight guidance says. You'll need that to justify your otherwise unnecessary journey to the airfield.

As an aside - I contribute to two other internet discussion forums to do with other activities that I do, both of which are now impossible under the latest lockdown, and I have to say that the tone of discussion with reference to it is much more, how shall I put this, "mature" on them than here.
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By Crash one
#1818114
You may fly your aircraft any where as long as you remain no closer than one metre from the vertically extended boundaries inside of your property in order to maintain social distancing. Any number of people in your own household may fly with you.
Bear in mind that “vertical” boundaries will diverge with altitude so you must negotiate with your immediate neighbours to remain two metres apart as altitude increases. :D