Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
By riverrock
#1819441
If tyre pressure goes down when in the air there isn't an awful lot I can do about it other than perhaps get the trucks on standby as I land?
My two aircraft, its visually obvious (even when one of them has its wheel pants on) when pressure is low.
#1819477
A large majority of tyre problems arise from continued use at below optimum pressure.

If a tyre looks soft at pre-flight, it probably has been already used at below specified pressure for some time.

In my view, a device to accurately display pressure before leaving the hangar would be useful in reducing in-service failures.
By cotterpot
#1819483
Charliesixtysix wrote:
In my view, a device to accurately display pressure before leaving the hangar would be useful in reducing in-service failures.



We have one in our aircraft - it is called a tyre pressure gauge and pilots are expected to take it out and use it. And they do, recording actual readings in our log. :thumleft:

If they forget and don't do it until out of hangar and a tyre needs air, the air hose won't reach and they will need to pull it back, so added reason to do it first. :D
#1819489
Sound practice :thumleft:

However, I would think that a large number of aircraft tyres, especially those with tight fitting spats, get a cursory dose of looking at, rather than a physical daily check.

Pressure monitors might not be for everybody, but I choose to have a monitor on my aircraft for several reasons:

1) Tyres and tubes last longer if correctly inflated.

2) It is a half hour job to strip the spats on our aircraft to check the pressures and in my experience valve leaks are often initiated due to inclusion of foreign matter as a result of pressure testing/inflating a tyre.


3) I often operate into narrow and remote strips, where knowing in advance ( in flight) of a tyre problem having become apparent since takeoff could be useful in decision making if to divert to somewhere with better facilities for landing/fixing the problem.

As I said, not for everybody- but possibly useful for some.
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By Rob P
#1819614
Unless I am muchly mistaken the primary seal is the valve cap.

The seal in the valve itself is secondary, and largely to stop the tyre deflating once you take the valve cap off.

Rob P
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