Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By Marvin
#1818577
I carry one of these normally used for Cycle Tyres but suffices for top ups when needed. Inflation from a flat is possible but can take time:
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I also have one of these on the airfield which I can charge up and then carry to the aeroplane;

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By PeteSpencer
#1818593
Shoestring Flyer wrote:What is wrong with a foot pump and normal tyre gauge? :?
Hardly going to break the Bank at £7.99 from Halfords is it!
Some people seem to like spending money on expensive gizmos when they are not necessary. :roll:
https://www.halfords.com/tools/garage-e ... T4QAvD_BwE
[/quote]


We bought a compressor because we:
1) Have mains electricity in the hangar and
2) We have:
2 'kin great and 2 smaller vintage Fergie tractor tyres
4 Golf buggy tyres
6 triple gang mower tyres and
3 arrer tyres to inflate.
We thought a compressor would be a tad quicker than your Halfords suggestion.
But thanks anyway :wink:
#1818609
PeteSpencer wrote:
Shoestring Flyer wrote:What is wrong with a foot pump and normal tyre gauge? :?
Hardly going to break the Bank at £7.99 from Halfords is it!
Some people seem to like spending money on expensive gizmos when they are not necessary. :roll:
https://www.halfords.com/tools/garage-e ... T4QAvD_BwE



We bought a compressor because we:
1) Have mains electricity in the hangar and
2) We have:
2 'kin great and 2 smaller vintage Fergie tractor tyres
4 Golf buggy tyres
6 triple gang mower tyres and
3 arrer tyres to inflate.
We thought a compressor would be a tad quicker than your Halfords suggestion.
But thanks anyway :wink:


OK, your situation is slightly different from the norm having a miriad of things to inflate but for ordinary aircraft tyres a foot pump over the years I have found is quite sufficient and easy to use. Doesn't take many pumps either to blow an aircraft tyre up from flat and a bit of leg muscle excercise can't be bad can it! :wink:
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By Dave W
#1819156
The aftermarket dustcap replacement versiond work just the same way, AIUI. They'd have to, otherwise there's no way of knowing the pressure inside the tyre.

A modification inside the wheel, as in automotive factory-implemented systems, isn't going to be a straightforward (or cheap) aviation refit.
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By kanga
#1819249
SteveX wrote:.., look at tyres on walk around, if look ok go flying. Check pressure with gauge every couple of months is ample.


hmm.. early in my PPL career I was renting C150s and C172s from a FC at a grass airfield. One day C172 tyres (spatted) 'looked' fine during walkround (aircraft already parked outside on the hard area), and felt so during taxi out and t/o roll. On landing (fortunately solo), as soon as mains touched the grass on landing, it slewed to one side of the runway grass and juddered to a halt partially blocking the 'runway'. Of course, it may have been a sharp stone or rut which happened to be exactly where the wheel touched, not a low pressure before I started... Anyway, thereafter I tried to be particularly careful during walkround with 'feel' as well as 'look' (including 'creep marks'); although, I confess, rarely with pressure gauge :oops: .

Once I was into a syndicate I was having to pull aircraft out of the hangar, and I guess greater rolling resistance would have been obvious :?
By Stu B
#1819254
Like you, Kanga, I like to pay attention to creep marks - but during a holiday in the US I decided to get a check-out to hire a 172. I was invited to do the pre-flight and most was OK - but I had to report back to the instructor that I could not see the creep marks. "What's a creep mark?" he asked! :roll:
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By MikeW
#1819439
townleyc wrote:What is wrong with the technology that car pressure monitors use? I presume they don't mess up the valves...

KE


Most work by monitoring the ABS sensors for different rotation speeds due to change of rolling radius with loss of pressure. Not really applicable!