Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
User avatar
By Genghis the Engineer
#1816185
SteveC wrote:
Genghis the Engineer wrote:Incidentally, this came out yesterday.

https://publicapps.caa.co.uk/docs/33/ORS4No1453.pdf

Basic summary, if you SOLI from the UK to somewhere in the EU, and have a valid EASA licence and class 1 or class 2 medical, you are exempt the requirement to hold a UK licence until the end of 2021.

G


Actually..... that's some really interesting wording. Its states if your licence is issued after 31/12/20 as a result of a SOLI then you are exempt. However its not possible to SOLI after the 31/12/20..............


Re-reading it more carefully, yes, it's a bit less helpful than one might have hoped. So if you SOLI'd before the end of this year, you get no dispensation - which includes me (hopefully it won't matter). So it's only actually going to help anybody who is in some strange no-mans land of SOLI being started before the end of the year and finished before the end of March.

G
User avatar
By SteveC
#1816189
yep, which is pretty much a handful of very lucky people dealing with some very flexible easa states. There is however a separate alleviation from the UK CAA that MIGHt cover the rest of us.....
By Pilot Pete
#1816212
I gave up an attempt to SOLI to IAA when all phone calls were met with pls email, and emails went unanswered.
I'll now wait and see what happens after the dust settles
User avatar
By skydriller
#1816232
Pilot Pete wrote:I gave up an attempt to SOLI to IAA when all phone calls were met with pls email, and emails went unanswered.
On which end? UK or Ireland? I recall the UK CAA were very clear about what you had to do.
When I did this at the end of 2017 the UK CAA had a dedicated team handling all SOLI by email (they would indeed point any calls to the dedicated email address for their team) but they kept you updated as to their end of the process, as yes there were delays due volume. The hard bit was getting the right info for them to get a UK PPL sorted first, alll other services was delayed due the then rush to get everyone SOLIed before the new year deadline.

On the french end I just called or emailed the nice lady in bordeaux direct... 8)

A seach on the "EASA" area will find several posts on the process, if I recall it was just before the first Brexit deadline 2017/2018.
By dectenor
#1816233
Genghis the Engineer wrote:
SteveC wrote:
Genghis the Engineer wrote:Incidentally, this came out yesterday.

https://publicapps.caa.co.uk/docs/33/ORS4No1453.pdf

Basic summary, if you SOLI from the UK to somewhere in the EU, and have a valid EASA licence and class 1 or class 2 medical, you are exempt the requirement to hold a UK licence until the end of 2021.

G


Actually..... that's some really interesting wording. Its states if your licence is issued after 31/12/20 as a result of a SOLI then you are exempt. However its not possible to SOLI after the 31/12/20..............


Re-reading it more carefully, yes, it's a bit less helpful than one might have hoped. So if you SOLI'd before the end of this year, you get no dispensation - which includes me (hopefully it won't matter). So it's only actually going to help anybody who is in some strange no-mans land of SOLI being started before the end of the year and finished before the end of March.

G
You are covered if you SOLI'd before the end of the year - the missing piece of the puzzle covering this category is a statutory instrument which gives validity to EASA licences on G-reg in the UK for up to 2 years from Jan 21. The CAA validation doc is then required to fly G-reg outside UK airspace. Nice of the CAA to publish a summary document explaining all of this :?

The Aviation Safety (Amendment etc.) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019 Schedule 3 paragraph 2:

Approvals, licences and certificates
2.—(1) Subject to paragraph 3, any other licence, certificate or approval issued by the European Aviation Safety Agency or by the national competent authority of an EEA state which continues to be in force or effective on or after exit day by virtue of Part 3 of Schedule 8 to the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018, is—
(a)to continue to be in force or effective on and after exit day for the remainder of its validity period up to a maximum of 2 years (subject to any earlier suspension or cancellation by the CAA); and
(b)to be treated as if it were issued by the CAA.
(2) This paragraph applies only to documents issued under Regulation (EU) No 2018/1139 and EU implementing Regulations made under it.
....... followed by paragraph 3:
Approvals, licences and certificates
3.—(1) Before any pilot licence (“Part-FCL licence”) which comes within the scope of paragraph 2 is used outside United Kingdom airspace on an aircraft registered in the United Kingdom, it must be validated by the CAA.
(2) The CAA must validate a Part-FCL licence under this paragraph, and must only do so, if—
(a)it was issued in accordance with Commission Regulation 1178/2011; and
(b)the licence-holder holds language proficiency in English of at least Level 4 on the Language Proficiency Rating Scale contained in Appendix 2 to Annex 1 (Part-FCL) to Commission Regulation 1178/2011.
By Pilot Pete
#1816341
skydriller wrote:On which end? UK or Ireland? I recall the UK CAA were very clear about what you had to do.
When I did this at the end of 2017 the UK CAA had a dedicated team handling all SOLI by email (they would indeed point any calls to the dedicated email address for their team) but they kept you updated as to their end of the process, as yes there were delays due volume. The hard bit was getting the right info for them to get a UK PPL sorted first, alll other services was delayed due the then rush to get everyone SOLIed before the new year deadline.


It was from the IAA end.
I did leave it late.
I was originally supposed to finish the CBIR with a friendly instructor/school in Austria. Due to covid that fell apart so in the lockdown gaps I attempted to sort the CBIR here in the UK.....all good.
However due to a cascading list of issues, that didn't work out.
So my next plan was again to finish with a 'package deal' aranged through the friendly team in Austria next year.
Oh wait! Now I need an EASA-land PPL. Hence me being last minute.
I was hoping that once the paperwork was in the system say beginning of Dec, it would be completed, even if anytime after 1st Jan 2021 but despite covid delays, apparently not.
My best option may be an EASA flight test and subsequent PPL application, provided the exams are not required.
I'll take a look at it in the new year.
User avatar
By skydriller
#1816344
Cant "like" your reply @Pilot Pete :(
Totally get how best laid plans etc, this year has screwed over alot of people, myself included, so I wish you well with whatever you can achieve.

Regards, SD..
Pilot Pete liked this
User avatar
By Genghis the Engineer
#1816384
Indeed, my plan had been a quick EASA IR when I got back from the USA doing my CPL/IR there about 18 months ago. A whole bunch of things interfered with that, including a new job, Covid, and Brexit.

With a tolerant employer, some redundancy money, help of SteveC in Jerez, and careful timing I *think* I've got it all together in time. I'll actually know if that's the case when I've seen both my CPLs, one British, one EASA/Irish with IRs on - but I hope I've done it all right, and on time.

But it's tested my planning and patience considerably!

G
User avatar
By shortstripper
#1816676
I don't have the intellect or will to scroll through all this SOLI? stuff. To be honest I don't understand it all as my brain is even older than my now old PPL. I had a look on one site but it was going on about LAPL, NPPL and part FCL stuff.

Can anybody tell me if my old UK PPL A (retained) or EASA PPL SEP (issued a several years ago based on my UK PPL A) will allow me to fly UK reg aircraft in the EU or hire within the EU (I have a house in Bulgaria 10km from a nice little airstrip).

Cheers SS
By PeteM
#1816712
My reading of things (with a little help from a certain AME) is;

UK aircraft and UK ppl - ok to go foreign. You can even get the aircraft fixed by one of those untrustworthy foreigners - so long as it is then checked within a week by a sterling UK licensed engineer!

UK ppl and foreign aircraft - needs to be validated (easy in Canada and USA just visit their offices with the paperwork) not easy in EASA. You need to do (I think) the exams (potentially in local language) and have >100hrs and test.

So I am in the process of SOLI to IAA. I left it late, emailed them and they said so long as they had all of the 'stuff' by 31 Dec OK. So hopefully the CAA have done their bit and sometime in the New Year I'll have an IAA EASA license - to join my UK one - which is no longer valid as an EASA license, but is ok as a UK one.

I just love this 'taking back control' stuff, massive admin just to try and retain things I already had and these political numbskulls trashed.......

So your easiest option in Bulgaria is probably fly with an instructor, or an EASA validation/transfer.
User avatar
By GrahamB
#1816715
PeteM wrote:.. and USA just visit their offices with the paperwork)...

The days of just rocking up to any old FSDO are long gone.

You first have to apply to the CAA for their letter confirming you are what you say you are, register with the US IACRA system and make an appointment at an FSDO where an inspector will interview you, process the application and issue the cardboard temporary certificate. Nothing difficult, but no longer something that can be done on the spur of the moment.
By Stu B
#1816725
To add to PeteM's reply (which I *believe* is correct as far as it goes) - my understanding is for both your scenarios you also will now have to have a full PPL medical (previously with a PPL you could have flown within LAPL privileges on a LAPL medical).

Self-declaration would never have been valid beyond UK FIR or with non-G-reg aircraft so no change in that respect.
User avatar
By SteveC
#1816751
shortstripper wrote:I don't have the intellect or will to scroll through all this SOLI? stuff. To be honest I don't understand it all as my brain is even older than my now old PPL. I had a look on one site but it was going on about LAPL, NPPL and part FCL stuff.

Can anybody tell me if my old UK PPL A (retained) or EASA PPL SEP (issued a several years ago based on my UK PPL A) will allow me to fly UK reg aircraft in the EU or hire within the EU (I have a house in Bulgaria 10km from a nice little airstrip).

Cheers SS


You will be able to fly G Reg with some more paperwork hurdles to jump through. You will not currently be able to fly EASA registered aircraft in Bulgaria. It would be up to Bulgaria to validate your UK licence. Cross portability has been lost as another delightful side effect of our exit from EASA.
User avatar
By Irv Lee
#1816791
I'm assuming that anyone who is flying G reg microlights in the UK on differences training on an SEP rating or privilege and has SOLI'd can continue, (unless this 'leaving' legislation redefines the phrase Part-FCL to mean UK-FCL), the ANO says this :
A Part-FCL licence with single-engine piston aeroplane privileges is not deemed to be rendered valid for a microlight aeroplane unless the holder of the licence has undergone
differences training in accordance with Chapter 2 of Part 2 of Schedule 8, appropriate for a
microlight aeroplane class rating.
User avatar
By SteveC
#1816809
The UK CAA have actually made it clear that they are not even changing the wording. Part FCL is still Part FCL, there is no such thing as UK FCL. So where we see Part FCL referred to it means both.