Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By ls8pilot
#1809165
I was "interested " (i.e. appalled) to hear on the latest Flyer news that not only are we likely to get more Royal Flight airspace notams, and they are saying the notice period will be reduced.

I wondered what the minimum notice period for a Notam is?
User avatar
By Flyin'Dutch'
#1809198
Wothesaid
User avatar
By ls8pilot
#1809205
I can certainly see there are circumstances you need to do that, but Charlie boy going to a rugby match doesn't really see in the same class. As @G-BLEW says could make for some interesting court cases if you infringe a TRA published after you took off!
By GAFlyer4Fun
#1809222
This is why it is a good idea to check notams/TRA(s) before every flight and not just once at start of the day.

Some will say that is over the top. Probably less hassle than the consequences if CAA start court proceedings.

It does not take long to check with all these fancy nav apps (provided they have an internet connection).
User avatar
By Gertie
#1809223
Boxkite wrote:Probably zero.

And you're still expected to take notice of them, even ones raised after you took off.

London Information: "Are you aware that you are heading towards a restricted area that was notamed a couple of minutes ago re the discovery of an unexploded bomb?"

Me: "No!"
By chevvron
#1809262
Operating out of Redhill, I was about a couple of miles south of Croydon when Redhill Tower broadcast details of an RA(T) which had just come into force instigated by the police.
Working out from the details that I was in it, I kept quiet and flew out of it!
Whilst at Farnborough, we used to broadcast a '5 minute warning' of Royal CAS(T) followed by a warning when it actually became active.
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By kanga
#1809280
After 9/11 the airspace in the DC-Andrews-Camp David triangle became much more restricted, both permanently for bits around each and by NOTAM at very short notice for the routes between them. The NOTAMs could be at very short or no notice, with some believed to be 'provisional bookings' or actually dummy. Ignorance 'it was promulgated after I took off' was no defence, the first awareness of violations could be generated by an Apache or F16 very close, and the penalties were potentially severe. As a result, locally based GA pilots got into the habit of treating the relevant NOTAMable areas as permanently restricted. I don't know if things are now more relaxed.

Very different from early '80s when one could fly a circular tour around DC at 1200' QNH not talking to anyone. It was a trip I often did with visitors, giving them clear slant views of Dulles, the White House-Capitol area, Mount Vernon, Andrews, Annapolis, Bay Bridge, Fort McHenry ..
#1809283
There is no minimum, but Royal protocols were always to use existing class A wherever possible, and their travel budgets are closely monitored, so I wouldn't be too worried.

I once turned up at Dundee from Cranfield, to be told by Leuchars ATC just before handover to Dundee that a NOTAM had just activated for a SAR operation around the Tay bridge, as somebody had just been seen to have jumped off, and the coastguard helicopter had been launched. I imagine that the interval between the problem and the NOTAM was in single figure minutes, and quite rightly so.

I've actually often used that as an example in meetings to explain problems of co-ordination of manned and unmanned aircraft. I got neatly into Dundee by listening out, ascertaining the helicopter's search pattern, and co-ordinating a safe, but very steep (throttle closed, full flaps and sidesliping) and non-standard approach to land onto 27. My standard question to anybody advocating automated UTM, is how their system would have managed that situation?

G
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By David Wood
#1809293
And of course, as we move towards the era of 5G, the implicit potential for the provision of in-flight data to low-level GA, and flexible-use airspace (all of which are, in my opinion, Good Things) we will probably have to recognise that as aviators our situational awareness will have to become more dynamic to keep pace with the changing picture.
By chevvron
#1809296
David Wood wrote:And of course, as we move towards the era of 5G, the implicit potential for the provision of in-flight data to low-level GA, and flexible-use airspace (all of which are, in my opinion, Good Things) we will probably have to recognise that as aviators our situational awareness will have to become more dynamic to keep pace with the changing picture.

Er last time I heard, you weren't supposed to use cellphones to/from aircraft.
User avatar
By David Wood
#1809297
chevvron wrote:
David Wood wrote:And of course, as we move towards the era of 5G, the implicit potential for the provision of in-flight data to low-level GA, and flexible-use airspace (all of which are, in my opinion, Good Things) we will probably have to recognise that as aviators our situational awareness will have to become more dynamic to keep pace with the changing picture.

Er last time I heard, you weren't supposed to use cellphones to/from aircraft.


I wan't talking about cellphones. I'm talking about data.
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By defcribed
#1809313
David Wood wrote:I wan't talking about cellphones. I'm talking about data.


Of course. We won't be allowed to use the 5G devices we'll already have, we'll need special certified aviation devices.

First Mode S, then 8.33, probably EC soon enough....... then 5G data uplink?

My long term aviation plan is to build an RV-8, and excluding major medical issues I probably have 30 years of flying left in me. But I often wonder if it'd be a hiding to nothing - by the time I've finished building it will we have been regulated and priced out of existence?
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By David Wood
#1809316
defcribed wrote:First Mode S, then 8.33, probably EC soon enough....... then 5G data uplink?


I think so. And why not? So much of what we do now in aviation is still firmly routed in the pre-radio age. The challenge will be whether or not the regulator(s) can up their game and keep pace with change and opportunity. The signs aren't good on that one, but I live in hope.