Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
By Ibra
#1809078
Kittyhawk wrote:
[
I use certified blind stick that I extend from the PIC window, it's way more cheaper :lol:


Or throw your guide dog out of the door and flare when the lead goes slack...


Can you use 3 cats for guidance, they are good for night vision (IR rated), flying with no visual references (3D gyro) and have nerves of steel and no task fixation compared to dogs, if you got 3 of them at the jump seats the landing will be a Cat3 :lol: :lol: :lol:
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By Flintstone
#1809140
Ibra wrote:I use certified blind stick that I extend from the PIC window, it's way more cheaper :lol:


Is that like the guide dog dangling out the window on its lead?
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By TopCat
#1809338
Trent772 wrote:The other explanation is the relative speed of the earth with latitude. It is fatter at the equator, (oblate spheroid if you wish to get picky) therefore goes faster - hence why a lot of rockets are launched close to equatorial regions - free speed.

If you go to say Barbados, the sunset is very quick indeed, almost blink and you miss it.

Er, this (my bold) has got nothing to do with why sunsets (and sunrises) are quick near the equator.

The free speed absolutely is why rockets are launched into orbit near the equator - and why they go east, too.

However, the tangential speed is irrelevant to sunsets.

Sunsets near the equator are quick because the sun descends more nearly vertically, so it goes below the horizon more quickly. Whereas at higher latitudes, it descends obliquely, so it takes longer to get below the horizon.

Trent772 wrote:As the "Commander", I was tasked to explain and despite at least a couple of libations, said as per above. This particularly less blessed lass absolutely refused to believe it, despite her colleagues getting it. She wandered off into the rapidly darkening night muttering..... :clown:

Yes. She was right not to believe you :P
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By AlanM
#1809355
Here in SERA land we have Sunrise (SR), Sunset (SS) Twilight End (TWE) and Twilight Begins (TWB). We don’t have the UK SS+30mins/SR-30mins.

Instead, the difference between TWE and SR can be anywhere from 27mins in the summer to 35mins today.

We have three auto settings on our airfield lighting panel - DAY/TWILIGHT/NIGHT.

Simples!

Here is a screengrab of our weather system page.

Image
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By lobstaboy
#1809371
TopCat wrote:Sunsets near the equator are quick because the sun descends more nearly vertically, so it goes below the horizon more quickly. Whereas at higher latitudes, it descends obliquely, so it takes longer to get below the horizon.


This is true but it doesn't explain the seasonal difference that @TheFarmer was talking about. I feel there must be more to it somehow.
By A4 Pacific
#1809376
This is true but it doesn't explain the seasonal difference that @TheFarmer was talking about. I feel there must be more to it somehow.

Anybody who’s interested just needs to read the link kindly posted by iceman. The first response to the OP.

It explains things perfectly. The sun sets quickest at the equinoxes, and slowest at the solstices.

Simples.
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By TopCat
#1809567
lobstaboy wrote:
TopCat wrote:Sunsets near the equator are quick because the sun descends more nearly vertically, so it goes below the horizon more quickly. Whereas at higher latitudes, it descends obliquely, so it takes longer to get below the horizon.


This is true but it doesn't explain the seasonal difference that @TheFarmer was talking about. I feel there must be more to it somehow.

Agreed. I wasn't commenting on the seasonal difference. Haven't had a chance to read @Iceman's link yet.