Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
By tecannon
#1796627
Hello Everyone!

I am a FAA Flight Instructor (CFI/MEI/CFII) pilot with dual nationality (British/American). I'm moving back home to Cornwall soon with my wife and I'd like to keep flying. Does anyone know of a UK based flight school with N-tail registered aircraft or individuals with an american aircraft that would like to share some flight time?

Best,
T
#1796684
If you have dual nationality you can own an N reg aircraft yourself. If you own one now you could bring it across without duty or VAT as “chattels”. You are required not to sell it for 2years (I think).
#1796689
tecannon wrote:Does anyone know of a UK based flight school with N-tail registered aircraft or individuals with an american aircraft that would like to share some flight time?

Hi

There are various legal complexities around renting N-registered aircraft in the UK, so that as a result, you are not going to find schools operating on the N reg in the UK, nor are you going to find ad hoc rentals of N-reg, except when the owner has failed to understand those restrictions!

Generalising, most N-reg aircraft in the UK are privately operated by owner/pilots, so you might get lucky and find one who is prepared to split some time with you on an informal basis, but you'll have to hunt them down.
#1796710
Flyingfemme wrote:.. If you own one now you could bring it across without duty or VAT as “chattels”. You are required not to sell it for 2years (I think).


with private cars, at least in the '80s when we did it, to avoid US import duty you had to have owned it for at least 6 months before it (or maybe you, or both) arrived in UK. It had been 12 months until shortly before. We operated a UK-standard RHD Volvo shipped straight to us in Maryland from Sweden for a year, which was 'interesting' :wink:

Obviously, things may have changed, and aircraft may be different.

Welcome back; onen hag oll
#1796714
Is in not possible to self-fly-hire (SFH) an EASA aircraft on a FAA licence in the UK? Has this changed?

In 2006, I got my FAA PPL(H) in March and did SFH in UK for 5months until August when I got my EASA (then JAR).
#1796716
@RisePilot Flying a G-reg aircraft on an FAA licence in the UK requires the FAA licence holder to have his licence approved by the CAA through the completion of form SRG2140 and associated hoop jumping (English language certification for example). The days when the licence was automatically accepted without formality are now in the rear view mirror.
RisePilot liked this
#1796722
kanga wrote:
Flyingfemme wrote:.. If you own one now you could bring it across without duty or VAT as “chattels”. You are required not to sell it for 2years (I think).


with private cars, at least in the '80s when we did it, to avoid US import duty you had to have owned it for at least 6 months before it (or maybe you, or both) arrived in UK. It had been 12 months until shortly before. We operated a UK-standard RHD Volvo shipped straight to us in Maryland from Sweden for a year, which was 'interesting' :wink:

Obviously, things may have changed, and aircraft may be different.

Nothing's changed.....that's why I said, "if you own one now".
kanga liked this
#1796728
To keep this going “Flyer Forum style”; what if he wants to fly a Lithuanian registered, US “light sport” aircraft with application made to switch to a UK Permit aircraft designation on a revalidated NPPL licence with PMD made on 12 April 2020 and only fly on Tuesdays?
Kemble Pitts liked this
#1796731
RisePilot wrote:To keep this going “Flyer Forum style”; what if he wants to fly a Lithuanian registered, US “light sport” aircraft with application made to switch to a UK Permit aircraft designation on a revalidated NPPL licence with PMD made on 12 April 2020 and only fly on Tuesdays?


I have some experience of flying Estonian aircraft on Wednesdays with a Kelloggs Cornflakes licence which I shall now share...
#1796751
2Donkeys wrote:@RisePilot Flying a G-reg aircraft on an FAA licence in the UK requires the FAA licence holder to have his licence approved by the CAA through the completion of form SRG2140 and associated hoop jumping (English language certification for example). The days when the licence was automatically accepted without formality are now in the rear view mirror.

I think also true for FAA ppls flying N reg "what-would-be-Easa-aircraft-if-G-reg" that are based here isn't it?
I am now getting at least one US trained pilot on each of my Zoom radio courses, and usually 2 or 3 qualified pilots even with radio licences, either rusty or just felt short changed in their original radio training. I hadn't realised how useful the course is to FAA pilots here until the first one tried it, and said it covered things he never dreamt of asking about and never knew. Even though aimed at UK FRTOL students, it covers our airspace and radio quirks and allows me to sign off 2140s for the FAA ppls. Some don't need the actual form as they have easa qualifications but not used to the UK.
2Donkeys, Iceman liked this