Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
#1796399
Rob L wrote:
ChrisRowland wrote:Are they that reliable? One unlucky fly could stop the float.


Yes, Chris, pretty reliable. Gravity has been around a while.
There are occasional issues with "stiction", but flies are never one of them. Flies tend not to fly vertically down into a small annulus between a wire and a hole!

I was thinking that a fly could hit the wire, which is exposed in the airstream, and it's carcase, stuck on the wire, could stop the float descending. Good to hear that it isn't possible.
#1796401
I would have thought the first issue if it is certified is for the maintenance compnay to agree (or not) that with the gauge appropriately placarded (and the A/P) the aircraft is safe to fly with whatever caveats they deem appropriate and subject to any restrictions (if there are any) in the POH.

Subject to (and in any event the same from the maintenance company if it is permit and they are happy to do) then at least the insurance and ANO aspects are covered and you can have some confidence that there are no ancillary risks that may not have been anticpated.

With that, I dont see an issue, without I personally wouldnt fly the aircraft (other than of course if it was a ferry trip and I was otherwise satisfied it was ok to do so).
#1796409
The fuel gauges in my Bulldog are pretty accurate. However, they run on electricity. A few years ago I had an issue with my voltage regulator where the battery would stop charging/topping up when it was full. For a few flights I took off then turned the master off to conserve the battery.

Problem was, I would forget....my heart missed a beat several times over the course of a few flights when I looked down at the fuel gauges and they both read empty. I would then remember the power was off and all was well.
#1796410
When the Champ's Ford Model A fuel gauge started playing up during a long day's flying, it was a relief when it settled showing zero and stayed there. Its major purpose is to indicate that the wing tank has dropped - and increasing the Champ smile as the fuel level goes up. The marked wooden stick never lies.

Replacement gauges are easy to buy, too.

8)
Flyin'Dutch', Ridders liked this
#1796419
IIRC FAA regs only require gauges to indicate 0 when the tanks are empty.

I would not worry about something that has always been dud but if you have now noticed 2 things are dud after 'maintenance' then I would be worried what else has become 'dud' but has not manifested itself (yet)

It's a recurring problem with all this new fangled stuff. Just fly a '57 Cub, no electric gauges and no AP.
#1796424
Flyin'Dutch' wrote:It's a recurring problem with all this new fangled stuff. Just fly a '57 Cub, no electric gauges and no AP.
1957?...That’s new fangled Frank :wink: 46 champ, no electrics, Model A fuel gauge that sort of works - However.... my AP sits in the back seat and seems to hold heading, and HGT well when engaged. Downside is sometimes the attitude gets out of whack and she hits me on the head with random objects like chart/chocks etc!
Rob P, Flyin'Dutch', Paul_Sengupta and 1 others liked this
#1796426
Flyin'Dutch' wrote:
I would not worry about something that has always been dud but if you have now noticed 2 things are dud after 'maintenance' then I would be worried what else has become 'dud' but has not manifested itself (yet)


Nail on head Frank

When I joined the group 25 years ago the single group officer ,the Secretary gave the nod and got this stuff done .

Now we’re a democracy and despite three officers everything has to go to a vote which means dozens of emails and delays.

Peter
Flyin'Dutch' liked this
#1796441
PeteSpencer wrote:[
Now we’re a democracy and despite three officers everything has to go to a vote which means dozens of emails and delays.

Peter


What's the world coming to! I'll tell you, it won't last!

:D :D
#1796444
One benefit of an actual fuel gauge (as opposed to a totalizer based tally or a calculation) is that if you've left a fuel cap off, it'll tell you. So I check both the totalizer and the steam fuel gauges during my FREDA check. On the assumption that I might have a chance and notice in time if I have left a fuel cap off.

Maybe not relevant for low wing?
#1796490
Rob L wrote:They are not infallable of course, Chris, but they are the most reliable fuel gauge I know.

I once had a Jodel with the same Gauge., it had a small Bobble on the Wire , if you departed with full Fuel , after an hour or so it would still be registering full , the airflow providing enough resistance to prevent the ' drop' . A reduction in speed to zero would rectify the problem. :lol: