Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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User avatar
By Miscellaneous
#1786487
Rob P wrote:
Hazel C wrote:im the only female aviator I have seen there so far! :D


Unless I am very much mistaken there's an amazingly accomplished lady aerobatic pilot operates from there.

Rob P

Never mind aerobatics for now, Rob. I logged back in expecting the GoPro footage of your pirouette to have been uploaded for viewing. :D :D :D
User avatar
By Hazel C
#1786492
Rob P wrote:
Hazel C wrote:im the only female aviator I have seen there so far! :D


Unless I am very much mistaken there's an amazingly accomplished lady aerobatic pilot operates from there.

Rob P


In that case I havent yet met her :D and would like to!
User avatar
By TheFarmer
#1786495
Ok, Hazel, reveal yourself!

Is your real name Tracey? In which case, congratulations on going solo. :D
User avatar
By Hazel C
#1786507
TheFarmer wrote:Ok, Hazel, reveal yourself!

Is your real name Tracey? In which case, congratulations on going solo. :D


Nope, Hazel is indeed my real name :D No Taildragger solo yet.... my next trip is Saturday .... so who knows....
By oldbiggincfi
#1786542
Mike Charlie wrote:A question for all you tailwheelers.....

I now have 1240 hours P1, have averaged 150 hours per annum past five years mainly in my C150 . In 2018 I did a tail wheel conversion in a Super Cub and managed to break a rib (a story for another time)

Not flown tail wheel since converting, before long I will have a Percival Proctor to tame...

My question is what would you suggest is the best route or training to bring me up to speed ready for type...?

Some suggest back to the Cub initially or Tiger Moth until instructor and I am happy. Then a heavier type maybe Chipmunk....? Somebody has even suggested time in a Harvard...?? The Proctor I am advised can be a handful, it’s big, heavy, has a VP propeller, fully castoring tail wheel and a dislike for stronger crosswinds

My late father owned a Mk V his preferred method was a wheeler unless he was operating into a shorter field where a three pointer was used. Helpful suggestions please


For my interest did your father break his arm on his propeller ?
User avatar
By Rob P
#1786557
Hazel C wrote:
In that case I havent yet met her :D and would like to!


Lauren Wilson by name, a quick Google seems to indicate she's doing a lot of ferrying currently.

Not to be confused with someone of the same name who "starred" in Love Island

Rob P
Highland Park, Hazel C liked this
By Highland Park
#1786584
Rob P wrote:
Hazel C wrote:
In that case I havent yet met her :D and would like to!


Lauren Wilson by name, a quick Google seems to indicate she's doing a lot of ferrying currently.

Rob P

IIRC, she was a First Officer with Flybe until its demise earlier in the year. Married to an ex - RN pilot who used to fly the Swordfish amongst others things. I met him at the Old Buck Airshow a few years ago, when he was displaying a Stearman. Seemed a really nice chap...

Ian
Rob P liked this
User avatar
By foxmoth
#1786604
Mike Charlie wrote:A question for all you tailwheelers.....

I now have 1240 hours P1, have averaged 150 hours per annum past five years mainly in my C150 . In 2018 I did a tail wheel conversion in a Super Cub and managed to break a rib (a story for another time)

Not flown tail wheel since converting, before long I will have a Percival Proctor to tame...

My question is what would you suggest is the best route or training to bring me up to speed ready for type...?

Some suggest back to the Cub initially or Tiger Moth until instructor and I am happy. Then a heavier type maybe Chipmunk....? Somebody has even suggested time in a Harvard...?? The Proctor I am advised can be a handful, it’s big, heavy, has a VP propeller, fully castoring tail wheel and a dislike for stronger crosswinds

My late father owned a Mk V his preferred method was a wheeler unless he was operating into a shorter field where a three pointer was used. Helpful suggestions please



If you want to get up to speed on tailwheel then come and see us at Lancsbarnstormers.co.uk. Our Ma5 charger presents just about the right level of difficulty to prepare you for most tailwheel aircraft.
User avatar
By TheFarmer
#1786615
A bigger MAUW isn’t really an issue with taildraggers. A large one can be easier to tame on the ground than a small one in many cases.

It’s basically all down to the combination and ratio of the following:

1. Main wheel track width. (Wider the better)
2. Distance between main wheels and tail wheel. (Longer the better (normally, but with exceptions)).
3. Wing length / weight (and ‘swing’ inertia). (Narrower and lighter the better)
4. Stall speed (lower the better)
5. Brake power in case an individual ‘dab’ is needed.
6. Wind direction
7. Surface (grass much better)
8. Engine power (take off torque swing)
9. In a tandem, whether you’ve got someone in the back or not (if it’s solo from front) as this will increase the chance of the tail wanting to overtake the nose. Less of an issue with bigger machines.

Basically. If you can keep the deviation from ‘straight ahead’ to no more than a tiny amount, it doesn’t matter what size the aircraft is. :thumleft:
seanxair, Sooty25 liked this
User avatar
By Rob P
#1786625
You missed u/c leg springiness :D

Rob P
User avatar
By Rob P
#1786633
Odd that. At the recent annual we put 40psi into the mains. Whilst it may have added some twitchiness, I'm convinced it saved the tyre from rolling off under sideways stress.

Rob P
TheFarmer liked this
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