Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By Rob P
#1783325
But presumably traffic around Bridlington have no such luxury?

Pointing out one case where it operates sensibly doesn't mitigate the unnecessary inconvenience caused by the others.

Rob P
cirrostratus liked this
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By rikur_
#1783354
Rob P wrote:But presumably traffic around Bridlington have no such luxury?



Correct. Full marks for Humberside LARS and Hibaldstow for proactive coordination. Never any doubt over whether it is active or not, and status proactively passed to relevant pilots in both cases.

Bridlington is officially outside both Humberside and Linton LARS coverage, and whilst not unusual to get a service from Humberside up there - the status of Bridlington paradrop seems to be generally 'unknown'.

No great hardship to avoid their 2 mile radius, but given earlier comments, do I need to be giving a much wider berth?
Rob P liked this
#1783356
Rob P wrote:But presumably traffic around Bridlington have no such luxury?

Pointing out one case where it operates sensibly doesn't mitigate the unnecessary inconvenience caused by the others.

Rob P


But both my posts highlight that with a bit of forethought, para drop activity, both local and en route can be predicted if you put your mind to in.

Just another minor point in the flight planning process.

My guess is most people don't try to plan for such risk mitigation, preferring instead to come on here and moan.

Peter :wink:
User avatar
By rikur_
#1783360
Not a moan - just seeking to be educated.
I don't mind avoiding a 2 mile radius, as the effort in avoiding it is less than the effort to find out if I can fly through it.
My question was whether that 2 mile radius is a reasonable representation of the area of risk ..... will the 100mph flying wing whatsits be outside this area?
Rob P, seanxair liked this
#1783362
rikur_ wrote:Not a moan - just seeking to be educated.
I don't mind avoiding a 2 mile radius, as the effort in avoiding it is less than the effort to find out if I can fly through it.


This should not be the case, it should not be hard. If there is active paradropping then someone should be on the frequency for that aerodrome. If you call and/or are on frequency but hear nothing, you should not have to avoid anything. But before you even get to that stage, the local FIS/LARs you are talking to should know if the jump plane is in the air - because there should be a frequency OCAS we are all on...

...oops, forgot, it doesnt work like that in the UK does it...
Rob P, rikur_, flybymike and 1 others liked this
#1783365
The guy that repacks my (glider) 'chute told me that he's bought himself a SkyEcho to be more visible while meatbombing. No idea what that's going to look like on SkyDemon.

the local FIS/LARs you are talking to should know if the jump plane is in the air

Every jump site has a Nominated Air Traffic Services Unit you can call to ask about activity. It's in the AIP and on an edge of the paper chart.
#1783367
skydriller wrote:
rikur_ wrote:Not a moan - just seeking to be educated.
I don't mind avoiding a 2 mile radius, as the effort in avoiding it is less than the effort to find out if I can fly through it.


This should not be the case, it should not be hard. If there is active paradropping then someone should be on the frequency for that aerodrome. If you call and/or are on frequency but hear nothing, you should not have to avoid anything. But before you even get to that stage, the local FIS/LARs you are talking to should know if the jump plane is in the air - because there should be a frequency OCAS we are all on...

...oops, forgot, it doesnt work like that in the UK does it...



Absolutely, we have the “parachute freq”, “microlight freq”, “safetycom”, any local airfield freq”, “London/Scottish information” etc.
I’m trying to find the “Yellow Emeraude freq”!!
Flyin'Dutch' liked this
#1783371
Crash one wrote:Absolutely, we have the “parachute freq”, “microlight freq”, “safetycom”, any local airfield freq”, “London/Scottish information” etc.
I’m trying to find the “Yellow Emeraude freq”!!


Im afraid I just cant "like" your post. I do agree though. And I was going to mention all those too, but wasnt 100% sure. Its dadt isnt it, and certainly doesnt help safety.
User avatar
By rikur_
#1783401
low&slow wrote:
Every jump site has a Nominated Air Traffic Services Unit you can call to ask about activity. It's in the AIP and on an edge of the paper chart.

So taking Bridlington as an example (not intending to pick on them, I'm sure they're a nice bunch) .... the AIP lists London Control as the notified body - so presumably I could call up London Info (I can think of 3 x LARS units that I might be talking to in the area, but definitely won't be talking to London Info)
There is no aerodrome frequency, but one of the gliding frequencies of 129.905 MHz is listed as an alternative contact.

Still no wiser on the original question as to whether the 100mph winged flying whatsits stay within the notified 1.5nm radius, or if not, how wide a berth such a site should be given.
Rob P liked this
#1783461
PeteSpencer wrote:Of course its not just the jump aeroplane clawing its way skywards or the meat bombs dropping at terminal velocity you need to be aware of:

During my weekend coastal bimble, having heard the paradrop aircraft in the air working Norwich I elected to pass well east of Beccles (offshore and well downwind actually) as he ran in for the drop:

I was glad I had switched to a Traffic service from Norwich as the aircraft stood on its nose and dived groundwards in front of me , hell bent on picking up more bombs.

More a 'dome' than a cone...................

Peter
Edit for clarity.

If I’m ever going near Beccles (although I now tend to use the listening squawk for Norwich), I will ask Norwich if they’re aware of any parachute activity there and if so, give it a wide berth. Having undertaken my PPL training at Old Buck while the parachutists were there (and having had to hold on many occasions while waiting for confirmation that all canopies were down), I learned to stay well out of their way. It might sometimes be a little inconvenient, but it’s far better than the possible alternative outcome if I get too close.

Likewise with gliding sites, if I’m likely to potentially fly near one marked on a map, I’ll give it a wide berth. Having been involved with 611 VGS for a number of years (albeit on the ground, not as a gliding instructor), I’ve seen a number of aircraft blasting straight through the overhead at or below maximum winch launch height (2000’ or less) when gliding operations were active, particularly when they were based at Swanton Morley; it left a lasting impression on me which I’ve taken into account to this day.

Ian
Rob P liked this
#1783530
I had my Arrow checkout by Gerry Honey back in the day at Swanton Morley when it was a sodding great field divided up the middle by a row of markers vaguely following the wind direction.
Gliders one one side, powered on the other doing opposing circuits.

And cables dropping all over the shop.

Kept me on my toes.

Peter :wink:
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By AndyR
#1783544
xtophe wrote:
AndyR wrote: gliding sites, one can, I believe, safely assume they are inactive on blowy, wet autumnal days.


Wet yes, blowy not necessarily. Always trainee to train and pilots keeping current.
And if a ridge or wave lift are accessible, windy day might see a lot of activity.


What would be the operating limit on wind speed out of interest?