Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
#1783788
The firefighter may have been spraying the foam before they extracted the pilot. That would make sense as they would not want to start working the aircraft to extract him without laying a blanket of foam around it to stop the whole area catching fire - those crops look pretty dry.

Secondly, AFFF forms a barrier between the fuel and the environment. It will seal in fuel and vapour and they will spray a blanket of AFFF to stop the environment being further polluted until the Environment Agency arrive and can make an assessment. The recovery of crashed aircraft cannot begin until the UK AAIB arrive and so the firefighters must also continue to protect the evidence until they arrive or tell them that the wreckage can be moved.

Complex stuff is emergency response - it’s not all about the first 5-10 minutes. :thumright: :thumright:
Dave W, JodelDavo, kanga and 2 others liked this
#1783802
And quote below taken from Aviation Safety Net report

"The Air Accidents Investigation Branch confirmed it will examine the incident. Dorset and Wiltshire Fire and Rescue Service said crew members used hydraulic cutting equipment to cut the man free after finding him inside the wreckage. They were on the site for just over an hour using foam to stem the flow of potentially hazardous aviation fuel, with the South Western Ambulance Service and Wiltshire Air Ambulance also called to the scene. The incident occurred just off the A346."
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By BoeingBoy
#1783840
Of course all of you are missing the point entirely in that the report is useless without knowing how much the pilots house was worth. After all, no self respecting reporter would be doing his job if he hadn't traced your address and gone online for a valuation.

Always bugs me as to why the papers refer to someone's house value as part of a story. Mind you, if you can afford to fly you must be living somewhere expensive so the politics of envy can be utilised to demonize the GA fraternity.

Long live the revolution!
#1783885
I really felt for the guy when I read they used the jaws of life to extract him. I can just hear him yelling 'I'm fine, just turn it over and I'll get out, or even just lft the tail a foot.'

It reminds me of a story my father once told me about a wooden framed hearse he had borrowed in the late fifties. It sprung a small fuel leak that prompted him to stop just outside a small town, not far from the fire station. At first it was a lot more smoke than flames and the fire engine turned up with some very keen firemen. They wouldn't listen to my father that the coffin inside was empty, and they hacked the thing to pieces to try to retrieve the coffin before the by now very damp and only slightly on fire hearse was consumed. The car was turned from slightly fire-damaged to scrapby the axe-weilding maniacs.
#1783891
Cheshire Fire and Rescue set fire to a crashed Jodel at an airstrip.

They turned up a while after the accident. The injured parties were already on the way to Leighton A & E.

Insisting they disconnect the battery despite everyone else saying "Don't" there was that sparky sound followed by that wooshy sound. :shock:

Their appliance was half a mile away and they hadn't thought to bring even an extinguisher. By the time they got back all that was left were the wing tips and rudder. :(
BoeingBoy liked this
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By gfry
#1783895
seanxair wrote:And quote below taken from Aviation Safety Net report

"The Air Accidents Investigation Branch confirmed it will examine the incident. Dorset and Wiltshire Fire and Rescue Service said crew members used hydraulic cutting equipment to cut the man free after finding him inside the wreckage. They were on the site for just over an hour using foam to stem the flow of potentially hazardous aviation fuel, with the South Western Ambulance Service and Wiltshire Air Ambulance also called to the scene. The incident occurred just off the A346."



This is utter bollox. The pilot was out before the services got there. He got himself out while my friend lifted the aircraft so he could get out.
flybymike, Lockhaven liked this
#1783896
Phew, that's good to hear. Hopefully it won't be a write-off after all then. Do you happen to know much about the state of the aeroplane? I always wanted to fly one of these and there are very few around, and it would be a shame if there was one less.
#1783905
gaznav wrote:The firefighter may have been spraying the foam before they extracted the pilot. That would make sense as they would not want to start working the aircraft to extract him without laying a blanket of foam around it to stop the whole area catching fire - those crops look pretty dry.


Really?

The scene in that photograph looks pretty...... errrr..... relaxed. I would be absolutely astounded if the pilot was still in the aircraft when that photo was taken.
#1783910
gfry wrote:
seanxair wrote:And quote below taken from Aviation Safety Net report

"The Air Accidents Investigation Branch confirmed it will examine the incident. Dorset and Wiltshire Fire and Rescue Service said crew members used hydraulic cutting equipment to cut the man free after finding him inside the wreckage. They were on the site for just over an hour using foam to stem the flow of potentially hazardous aviation fuel, with the South Western Ambulance Service and Wiltshire Air Ambulance also called to the scene. The incident occurred just off the A346."



This is utter bollox. The pilot was out before the services got there. He got himself out while my friend lifted the aircraft so he could get out.


I didn't write it. Only quoted it. BBC also reports he was cut out so glad to hear that wasn't the case