Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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#1781810
2Donkeys wrote:If you do your barrel rolls properly, you don't need to strap the luggage down....


Who said anything about properly? I more had in mind my barrel rolls.

:lol:

Rob P
2Donkeys liked this
#1781978
Rob P wrote: I shall continue to empty the aircraft of every loose object before heading off for a practice.

Rob P


It's OK. I have fixed it :lol:
2Donkeys liked this
#1782229
Shoestring Flyer wrote:....and the penalties for not doing the RT Traffic calls in French , when 90% of the circuit traffic at Le Touquet are English pilots, are what exactly?

If the rule is to speak French,do it.Why asking what the penalty is ? :mrgreen:
Smaragd liked this
#1782232
^^^what he said^^^

If you arent comfortable making circuit calls in French, then make sure to arrive when ATC is there to speak in English. Its not hard. Its about safety. If there are other brits there say calls in French then English too if you think its safer, but make the French calls as they are required.

Regards, SD..
#1782280
Yes, the notation in the VAC usually says "A/A Fr seulement". A/A effectively means traffic calls and the crib sheets (widely available) should be sufficient vocabulary and not hard for everyone to learn. So why bother to make the calls in English too?
#1782283
The French will always protect their right to use French, or demand the use of French, in their airspace. There was a heck of a row regarding SERA.1401, which requires airports with more than 50.000 international IFR movements p.a. to use English only.

https://www.stac.aviation-civile.gouv.f ... lume_2.pdf

The result was predictable. :)
ENR 1.1.7
Important note 1: In France, it is possible to use the French language in radiotelephony on all aerodromes, including airports with more than 50,000 international IFR movements per year.
#1782288
matthew_w100 wrote:Yes, the notation in the VAC usually says "A/A Fr seulement". A/A effectively means traffic calls and the crib sheets (widely available) should be sufficient vocabulary and not hard for everyone to learn. So why bother to make the calls in English too?


I agree. Pilots who do not understand circuits calls in French should not be in an 'FR only' circuit, unless they are in formation with someone who does.
2Donkeys liked this
#1782334
matthew_w100 wrote:So why bother to make the calls in English too?


Safety.

Its the same reason that although I primarily speak English to Controllers at aerodromes that allow it, if I hear another French pilot speaking French, I will often repeat my position calls in French for better situational awareness for the other local pilots.

Regards, SD.
Flyin'Dutch' liked this
#1782341
patowalker wrote:
matthew_w100 wrote:Yes, the notation in the VAC usually says "A/A Fr seulement". A/A effectively means traffic calls and the crib sheets (widely available) should be sufficient vocabulary and not hard for everyone to learn. So why bother to make the calls in English too?


I agree. Pilots who do not understand circuits calls in French should not be in an 'FR only' circuit, unless they are in formation with someone who does.


I think my main point is that it won't take more than an hour to learn the circuit calls in French. They might as well have been a foreign language when you learned them in English and you must have managed that...
Rob P liked this
#1782342
What I find very strange about 'FR only' on A/A is that it only applies to certain aerodromes. This makes little sense, as it means at some aerodromes French and British pilots can find themselves making calls in their own language, none of which are understood by the other.
#1782862
OK, so just got back from L2K to be met by Herr Flic and partner in lovely tight black uniforms. Quite cross, because amongst all the forms I'd filled in I hadn't done one of these:

https://visas-immigration.service.gov.u ... cator-form

This form lets them a) monitor your performance of 14 day self-isolation, and b) inform you if any of your fellow travellers come down with the 'rona.

In a typical bit of Britishness, it was worth sending out a brace of officials (on a Sunday) to someone who had a) come from a country exempt from self isolation requirements and b) in a plane containing only his household. Both facts apparent from the (properly completed) ordinary GAR. Anyway, we were forced to spend half an hour sitting on the wing trying to work through the inept online process before we were allowed to rush off to the toilet.

But we're British, damnit. And an uncompleted form is treason against society. So don't forget it!
#1782863
Hi Matthew_w100, very interesting.

I came back from L2K today and was also met by a couple of Border Force staff at a farm strip, who were maticulous in reviewing documents but courteous and very professional and I wasn't asked for the form you mention. I just explained I'd flown out in the morning, had lunch and come home, having met up with some friends in another aircraft at L2K. The other aircraft landed back at Biggin and they got the same treatment as you and it took them a good 45 minutes to submit the forms and lots of the information requested wasn't relevant.

So does anyone know if the forms are required if coming in from one of the countries that is on the list that does not require isolation.
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