Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By linton
#1771194
You go out to your aircraft for the first time in months and when you remove the engine cowl you find this.

Image

The RSPB website states

"Is it legal to move or destroy active birds' nests?

Almost certainly no. All birds their nests and eggs are protected by law: the Wildlife & Countryside Act of 1981. This makes it an offence, with certain exceptions, to deliberately take, damage or destroy the nest of any wild bird while it is in use or being built. It is also illegal to take or destroy the egg of any wild bird"

So, What would you do?
By mpk
#1771199
If there are no birds attending that nest then what's inside is already dead.

There's a reason why all the BA planes parked up have engine covers on, even just plastic, why do light aircraft never have them?
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By Charles Hunt
#1771230
Depends.

If I was reasonably current, or going overseas shortly I might consider leaving it there.

If I hadn't flown for 6 months due to a very wet winter and medical restrictions, then I might get a friend to lift it as gently as possible to their best guess for an alternative location, if at all possible in view of mum or dad.
By NorthSouth
#1771243
linton wrote:All birds their nests and eggs are protected by law: the Wildlife & Countryside Act of 1981. This makes it an offence, with certain exceptions, to deliberately take, damage or destroy the nest of any wild bird while it is in use or being built

Plenty scope there. It's clearly not "being built". Is it "in use"? And even if it is either of those, the law (apparently) doesn't mention "move".
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By rf3flyer
#1771244
What would I do?
    1 I would disregard any and all advice from the RSPB! A self important, guilt ridden, interfering busybody of an organisation...IMO.
    2 I would not create a hostage to fortune by discussing any course of action with anyone, and certainly not on a public forum.
FTAOD re. point 1, I like birds and tolerate them in the hangar, just as I quite like field mice, but when/if they get into the aircraft they have crossed a line and the gloves come off.
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By Rob L
#1771283
Personally, I would close the cowl, walk away quietly and wait just a few weeks to allow the eggs to hatch and fledge, taking photos periodically using a borescope or similar for a viral You Tube timelapse video. :D

Next year, get some cowl plugs!

Keep us posted!

[Edit: I would also re-title the thread with something relevant to the topic :evil: ]
cockney steve liked this