Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
  • 1
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 30
#1771167
chrisbl wrote:... a typical PPL skills tests requires about 2.5 hours in the cockpit....


mine took 1 hour - but it was several decades ago .. :roll:

[yes, I know the mandatory elements have increased :) ]
flybymike liked this
#1771173
If this virus is transmitted by aerosol or physical contact between contaminated surfaces and ones respiratory system. Is there a material that will filter the virus out and stop it being inhaled?
Or are we talking about a full NBC military rig or nothing?
Is wearing a mask pointless because it goes right through it?
Any medics, In other words, How small are the particles? Can a filter kill it? Can a filter collect it?
Just some thoughts, may have been covered, so don’t beat me to death.
#1771180
chrisbl wrote:Spare a thought for examiners. a typical PPL skills tests requires about 2.5 hours in the cockpit.
It not just about proximity but also duration.


Lots of talking and not much flying for 2 x 100 kgs .

Simulated Forced Landing done for real ?
By chrisbl
#1771186
kanga wrote:
chrisbl wrote:... a typical PPL skills tests requires about 2.5 hours in the cockpit....


mine took 1 hour - but it was several decades ago .. :roll:

[yes, I know the mandatory elements have increased :) ]


In your day (and mine) the Navigation Skills test was done mid training, now the Nav accounts for about and hour or so of the PPL skills test.
#1771204
Crash one wrote:If this virus is transmitted by aerosol or physical contact between contaminated surfaces and ones respiratory system. Is there a material that will filter the virus out and stop it being inhaled?
Or are we talking about a full NBC military rig or nothing?
Is wearing a mask pointless because it goes right through it?
Any medics, In other words, How small are the particles? Can a filter kill it? Can a filter collect it?
Just some thoughts, may have been covered, so don’t beat me to death.


A properly fitted disposable triple layer surgical mask will catch around 90% of a sneeze. One fitted without a tight seal around the sides will catch around 70%. Wearing no mask will catch nothing at all. So wearing a mask is better than not, disposing of it carefully and washing hands after touching it is also necessary, but again sneezing into your hand and then not washing it is many times more likely to make you a transmitter.
#1771215
TLRippon wrote:
Crash one wrote:If this virus is transmitted by aerosol or physical contact between contaminated surfaces and ones respiratory system. Is there a material that will filter the virus out and stop it being inhaled?
Or are we talking about a full NBC military rig or nothing?
Is wearing a mask pointless because it goes right through it?
Any medics, In other words, How small are the particles? Can a filter kill it? Can a filter collect it?
Just some thoughts, may have been covered, so don’t beat me to death.


A properly fitted disposable triple layer surgical mask will catch around 90% of a sneeze. One fitted without a tight seal around the sides will catch around 70%. Wearing no mask will catch nothing at all. So wearing a mask is better than not, disposing of it carefully and washing hands after touching it is also necessary, but again sneezing into your hand and then not washing it is many times more likely to make you a transmitter.


Thank you.
Our District Nurse visited my wife recently for a blood sample, nothing to do with CV19, on leaving she removed the mask, gloves etc and in a plastic bag asked me to dispose of them.
Having a close look at the mask it appears to be made of some paper type of fabric, with a pipe cleaner sown into the top to fit round the nose area.
What there is in the way of a chemical virus barrier I have no idea, but being almost as adept with a sewing machine as a lathe, I could certainly make one of these from three or more layers of cotton.
Whether that exercise would be a waste of time may be the question?
Washing it in soap and water, microwave, disinfectant etc for repeated use???
#1771219
SteveC wrote:
.....At the end of the day whatever our fears we all have to get working again and get the economy moving before the money runs out. My lettuce has grown beautifully during this period but none of the cash I planted at the same time has sprouted so we are back to earning it the old fashioned way.......


Spoken like true Capitalist.
Crash one liked this
#1771222
TLRippon wrote:
SteveC wrote:
.....At the end of the day whatever our fears we all have to get working again and get the economy moving before the money runs out. My lettuce has grown beautifully during this period but none of the cash I planted at the same time has sprouted so we are back to earning it the old fashioned way.......


Spoken like true Capitalist.


I’m on a couple of pensions, so the income hasn’t altered at all, in fact the bank balance has increased quite nicely due to the lack of burning mogas in the air or car etc :D :D
By RayP
#1771251
Crash one wrote:...
Having a close look at the mask it appears to be made of some paper type of fabric, with a pipe cleaner sown into the top to fit round the nose area.
...
Washing it in soap and water, microwave, disinfectant etc for repeated use???


I wouldn't microwave a pipe cleaner :shock:
#1771258
Crash one wrote:If this virus is transmitted by aerosol or physical contact between contaminated surfaces and ones respiratory system. Is there a material that will filter the virus out and stop it being inhaled?
Or are we talking about a full NBC military rig or nothing?
Is wearing a mask pointless because it goes right through it?
Any medics, In other words, How small are the particles? Can a filter kill it? Can a filter collect it?
Just some thoughts, may have been covered, so don’t beat me to death.


This was posted on Twitter by UCD Centre for Precision Surgery, Mater Hospital Dublin a few days ago:

Image
kanga liked this
  • 1
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 30