Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
#1749555
I find it hard to get my head around all this SOLI scaremongering .

Is the UK really going to turn into such a pariah country that overnight no one will recognise a UK issued PPL for flight outside our shores?

I certainly don’t intend to chuck in my lot with somewhere like Austria a country I’ve never even visited and whose language I don’t speak to protect myself against some perceived bureaucratic licence Armageddon at some unknown date in the future .

Peter :wink:
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#1749584
PeteSpencer wrote:I find it hard to get my head around all this SOLI scaremongering .
Is the UK really going to turn into such a pariah country that overnight no one will recognise a UK issued PPL for flight outside our shores?

I refer you to the post below which I made earlier. No scaremongering. Just fact.
skydriller wrote:As with EVERYTHING to do with Brexit, The vast majority of people will not be directly affected by the UK leaving Europe however that happens. However, anyone who did exactly what was promoted 20yrs ago, and went out and made the European union part of their lives, be it personally, or professionally, will be majorly affected and has needed to mitigate the negative aspects of leaving as much as they can.

For Pilots, this means SOLI.
#1749606
There are a number of current AMEs that will be getting an EASA AME authorisation as well as a CAA one in the future
One example (and I suspect there are others from this Parish):
https://www.avmed.org.uk/airlines-and-a ... -medicals/

UPDATE 2 February 2020:

From EASA update on 01 February 2020:

“The United Kingdom withdrew from the European Union on 31/01/2020 at midnight (Brussels time) and is now a Third Country. Under the terms of its Withdrawal Agreement, EU Law will apply for the UK during a transition period until 31/12/2020. During this time, the UK will be treated as an EU member state, but will no longer take part in any decision making or decision shaping activities at EASA (‘principle of non-participation’)”.

Hence we are able to carry out renewal and revalidation medical examinations on holders of Austrian and Irish licences, and all EU27 licences at least until the current planned end of the transition period, 31 December 2020; there is no need to have the medical carried out by a non-UK AME. We are seeking approval to continue to issue EU27 medical certificates beyond the end of the transition period.
#1749684
PeteSpencer wrote:Just remind me where these UK resident Austrian SOLI’d. PPL/CPL/ATPLs get their medicals done?

Peter


Generally AMEs are smart people and understand the implications of Brexshit on aviation and are making sure they are still able to serve their existing market. For those of choosing stay European there will be no difficulty in maintaining our medicals and privileges. Its the dwindling pool of UK ICAO licence holders that should be more concerned. But hey they have their blue passports to wave at Johnny Foreigner........ :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
#1749696
Can anyone (@SteveC ?? explain how the following would work in practice with an Austro Control licence for someone UK based:

Class rating revalidations
FI revalidations
FE authorisation / revalidations

Many thanks for any help.
#1749769
Balliol wrote:Can anyone (@SteveC ?? explain how the following would work in practice with an Austro Control licence for someone UK based:

Class rating revalidations
FI revalidations
FE authorisation / revalidations

Many thanks for any help.


Any EASA Examiner may do them without the CAA Gold plating as they are done now. All Examiner authorisations are done by SFE’s and there quite a few of us now under Austro Control. In fact there are now more Austro Control Examiners in the UK than UK SFE Examiners!!! Austro Control do not have a Staff Flying Unit as they delegate everything to industry in accordance with Part FCL. On the UK gold plates this and thinks that the staff examiners are better than industry examiners....... Or we could argue they are looking after their own jobs....

You can also request a non Austro control SFE do the AOC for you as well if there is no SFE local to you. But in practice there are no shortage of us who can do it. However its worth going to Austro Control at least once to see the set up and meet the people, much smaller and more streamlined operation than the UK.

The reality is they are a delight to deal with, everything is in English and everything is done as intended by Part FCL and the service is excellent.
Flyin'Dutch' liked this
#1749896
SteveC wrote: Its the dwindling pool of UK ICAO licence holders that should be more concerned.

Why, if I can do all I need with a UK issued licence flying a UK registered aircraft, and an FAA 61.75?

I also just don’t get ‘dwindling’. I personally don’t know anyone other than those with a commercial/training interest, or some family reason, who have transferred SOLI. The vast majority of leisure/hobby PPLs will just carry on as before IMHO.
#1749898
GrahamB wrote:The vast majority of leisure/hobby PPLs will just carry on as before IMHO.


No doubt but 500 recreational pilots moving is not an insignificant number of active GA pilots to leave the UK CAA.

With a sizeable number of commercial pilots, AOC holders and recreational fliers going and the CAA needing to scale up its capacity there will be increased costs (and 6% profit) that need to be carried by a smaller base.
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#1749899
Is the implication that there may potentially be fewer FI/FEs available? From a LAPL/PPL perspective "dwindling" isn't quite the right word. More so for the commercial licences.
#1749903
Bathman wrote:If Grant's got any sense we will just become a FSDO.


Why - not for the ease of getting a medical.

Getting a Basic Med is considerably more hassle and potentially limiting than an EASA LAPL medical.
#1749905
PaulB wrote:Is the implication that there may potentially be fewer FI/FEs available? From a LAPL/PPL perspective "dwindling" isn't quite the right word. More so for the commercial licences.



I think dwindling is exactly the right word. We now SOLI every single PPL that we teach because funnily enough they want EASA licences. The PPL issue numbers have been dwindling for years, the stats are there for everyone to see. Bear in mind those PPL issues had a large percentage of people passing through PPL on the way to CPL it becomes even more of a problem when you actually understand the stats.

The UK is too tiny a pot for people to want a commercial licence that restricts them to working in the UK only and all the big airlines want EASA anyway.

People at the higher levels like FI/FE etc are not going to restrict their options by being stuck to UK only training and testing and are moving accordingly. You can’t undo years of globalisation whatever people think BoJo has promised.

So I think the UK Flight training industry is going to be shrinking noticeably in the next few years and those left are going to have to pick up the tab for paying for the behemoth that the CAA infrastructure is for a very small number of pilots........
Flyin'Dutch' liked this
#1749910
Flyin'Dutch' wrote:500 recreational pilots moving is not an insignificant number of active GA pilots to leave the UK CAA.


But have they left? I made sure I had a UK icao PPL before SOLI - and I just revalidated itlast month. If they were smart the others did the same too in order to hedge their bets (you can never have too many licences). I would be surprised if those with other licences didnt do the same.

Regards, SD..