Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
#1746259
GrahamB wrote:
Skyflyer69 wrote:I have held a UK PPL LIFETIME license since 1991 which cost me a lot of money and allows me to fly single engine up to 5700KG so why should I have to pay to change my license because THEY change the rules. This is a money making scam. They did this to is with driving licenses making us pay every 10 years to have a new photo ID. I am sure many other countries wouldn't put up with this so why do we?

It appears that you have joined the forum just to post this whinge, and so may not be fully appraised of the history behind EASA and pilot licensing.

Fact - up until April 20th this year you have been/will be able to fly any of the aircraft you flew before on your existing licence (albeit with some qualification or limitations). This deadline may well be further extended.

Fact - pilots in the other 27 EASA states will have had to go through just the same licence conversion as in the UK, so it’s not a ‘money making scam’ dreamt up by the CAA. I’m sure most of the CAA staff would rather not have had to go through all the pain of licence conversion administration themselves, but concentrate on more important things.

Fact - the CAA is mandated by law to recover their costs, plus a margin, so they have little choice but to pass those costs on. They are under pressure every year from the rest of the industry to increase GA related charges, as they see themselves as subsiding us.

Fact - the CAA have introduced such things as the PMD, training in permit types, IFR approval for permit types etc all of which are aimed at lowering the costs of GA. How does this equate to a ‘money-making scam’?

Fact - your lifetime licence was valid ‘unless suspended, revoked ...etc’. At the moment nothing has changed, and depending on our future status in EASA, and the top point above, you may be able to carry on as before indefinitely. Equally you may have to shell out for an EASA licence. Well tough luck, snowflake, sometimes shyte happens.

Sit back, take a while to count your blessings, and contemplate that the mere fact you can fly at all makes you very lucky and privileged. :thumright:


That is the most obnoxious reply to anyone I have seen on these forums, :thumright:
townleyc liked this
#1746650
JAFO wrote:
flybymike wrote:Previous extensions have been around six months before expiry.


Mike, the extension to last year's exemption to allow NPPL holders to fly EASA aircraft was published on 12th February (for 8th April end date).


So does that means as an NPPL holder, with (currently) an NPPL medical, I may continue to fly EASA aircraft?
and likewise when I replace with a PME?

If so that is great for me

{Edit] I should learn to read! Has this years NPPL exemption been issued yet?

KE
#1746662
I think the NPPL exemption was changed to the adoption of a derogation which is, from our point of view, a technicality as it still runs out on, I think, 7th April. I have an NPPL with a PMD and currently fly an EASA aeroplane. What I will be able to do after April I do not know.

If I've misunderstood that or am plain wrong or I've missed something then I would be tickled pink to be put right.
#1746676
JAFO wrote:What I will be able to do after April I do not know.

If I've misunderstood that or am plain wrong or I've missed something then I would be tickled pink to be put right.


If the exemption is not renewed, then my understanding is that you will no longer be able to fly an EASA aircraft, so will be limited to Annex 1 aircraft such as those on a permit.

Someone cleverer than me may come along and correct this.

Ian
JAFO liked this
#1746774
Also Bulldogs. Some are on Permits, some are on C of As, but all are Annex 1.

GrahamB wrote:Fact - up until April 20th this year you have been/will be able to fly any of the aircraft you flew before on your existing licence (albeit with some qualification or limitations).


Not so. The "exemption" only allows LAPL privileges on a UK licence, so you can't fly aircraft over 2000kg and can only fly with a maximum of three passengers. It shouldn't need an exemption anyway, the EU should have no business telling us what we can or can't do on a UK licence with G registered aeroplanes. When they start restricting national licences, it stops being a collection of individual states under one umbrella and becomes one superstate.

GrahamB wrote:Fact - pilots in the other 27 EASA states will have had to go through just the same licence conversion as in the UK, so it’s not a ‘money making scam’ dreamt up by the CAA. I’m sure most of the CAA staff would rather not have had to go through all the pain of licence conversion administration themselves, but concentrate on more important things.


True, and I'm generally supportive of the CAA, but they made a rod for their own back with the amount of paperwork/administration required. If a UK ICAO compliant licence was previously owned, it should just be a £15 fee to cover paper, ink, postage and that little blue plastic wallet (and maybe a few mins of someone's time), and the licence issue basically rubber stamped with an online (or simple form) application. Maybe it was EASA rules which stopped this from happening (needing proof of radio nav, etc, though all this could have been forgotten about with grandfather rights).

GrahamB wrote:Fact - the CAA is mandated by law to recover their costs, plus a margin, so they have little choice but to pass those costs on. They are under pressure every year from the rest of the industry to increase GA related charges, as they see themselves as subsiding us.


See above. The FAA have been charging $2 to cover licence re-issue to recover the cost involved...

GrahamB wrote:Sit back, take a while to count your blessings, and contemplate that the mere fact you can fly at all makes you very lucky and privileged. :thumright:


So it's all ok then...
skydriller liked this