Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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#1738171
As the title says..... there is an exemption that allows a PMD to be used with Part.FCL licences and/or EASA regulated aircraft. It expires in April.

Are there any whispers about it being extended given the B word situation, or will we all have to rush to see an AME to continue flying?
#1738185
flybymike wrote:AMEs will be swamped if there is no last minute extension.


You've got my number.......







BTW I dont expect to retire on the proceeds of a wave of medical applications.......
Richard Dastardly, A le Ron, townleyc and 2 others liked this
#1738216
Organisations including the the BGA and LAA are already lobbying the CAA hard on this. The exemption has been a significant success in reducing cost and bureaucracy with no diminution in safety.

The CAA are however facing a concerted pushback from AMEs in other EASA states. Suspect that it will be a case of 'let's see what the Brexit/EASA relationship will be, then review again in the next few months'.
PaulB, Flying_john, Flyin'Dutch' and 1 others liked this
#1738264
Stephen Slater wrote:Organisations including the the BGA and LAA are already lobbying the CAA hard on this. The exemption has been a significant success in reducing cost and bureaucracy with no diminution in safety.

The CAA are however facing a concerted pushback from AMEs in other EASA states. Suspect that it will be a case of 'let's see what the Brexit/EASA relationship will be, then review again in the next few months'.


EASA and the UK CAA are quite happy with things as they are and if the current UK/EU/EASA/CAA equation survives Brexit then I would be surprised if the situation in the UK changes.

If the UK remains in EASA there is a fair chance that the UK model could be adopted across other EASA states, this has already happened with the medical certification of insulin dependent diabetics being able to get medical certification in Ireland and Austria and these pilots being able to operate EASA wide.

Should the UK's EASA membership be a casualty of Brexit then all bets are off, no doubt the UK CAA would continue to maintain its enlightened medical regulation in relation to UK operations but how far that would go for UK based operations and licensing operating into Europe would remain to be seen.

It would be a wry paradox if the taking back of regulatory control would de facto mean fewer opportunities for UK pilots and operations but let's not stray in that arena.

Although it is no secret that some regulators are concerned about the liberalisation we in the UK have seen, EASA as an organisation itself is quite happy to go down that road.

Their view is very much let's go where the evidence takes us.
Edward Bellamy liked this
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