Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By kanga
#1737017
ChampChump wrote:..why don't we have a sticky thread somewhere with them?

ISTR I collated some responses in a thread a few years back..


:thumright:

this would save me a bit of retyping, but I would also now have additions :)
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By davef77
#1737366
I was going to mention the Richard Bach books too, until I was pipped at the post :thumright:

I recall, what I think was, the first version of such a book list on what used to be called “The Flyer List” back in the 90s. Many of the same books were there of course.

A couple of worthy additions here:

I think that “The Right Stuff” is still the most awe-inspiring and fun read about the early days of space exploration - the film of the same name is also one if my all time favourites, but the book is even better.

For flying-technical books, Alan Cassidy’s “Better Aerobatics” is not only the best book on aerobatics, widely seen as the definitive work, but I think it is a great example of educational writing. It is technically accurate, but also fun and often quite witty. It is one of those books that you return to over and over again and learn something new from every time.
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By seanxair
#1737500
rf3flyer wrote:I don't think this one has been mentioned but a Christmas present from No.1 son was 'Spitfire' by John Nichol. I'm about a third through so far and it's excellent.


Thought it may have been in my stocking but wasn't. Will be in Waterstones with the children over the next few days so will be on the lookout. Glad to hear it is good.
#1737508
Personally, I enjoyed Stick n Rudder so much I’ve read it 3 times & still refer to it now.
Just have to get your head around some of the language/grammar used (aircraft are ‘ships’ for example).
Although written a long time ago, I still find it incredibly relevant
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By rf3flyer
#1737568
@seanxair Just don't expect a technical book. There are some technical details, sure, but it's a collection of personal accounts of people's connection with and love of the Spitfire from those who flew it, maintained it and fought it during WW2. I haven't finished it yet so it might extend post war but the personal accounts are what give the book it's charm.
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By seanxair
#1737598
rf3flyer wrote:@seanxair Just don't expect a technical book. There are some technical details, sure, but it's a collection of personal accounts of people's connection with and love of the Spitfire from those who flew it, maintained it and fought it during WW2. I haven't finished it yet so it might extend post war but the personal accounts are what give the book it's charm.


Sounds perfect for me thanks!
#1737607
The lonely sea and the sky by Francis Chichester. His invention of the “offset landfall” method of navigating to Norfolk Island (if he missed it, he was going to get wet) is an amazing tale. All done with a sextant from a DH Gypsy Moth....
Just brilliant.
Last edited by TimWalker01 on Sun Dec 29, 2019 9:29 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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By mossie
#1738803
A Rabbit in the Air - David Garnett 1932.

Short account / diary of learning to fly around 1930. I gave a copy to my instructor as a "passing " gift.

Just an ordinary chap who wanted to fly - usual trials and tribulations (time, money etc) but as an author he could wordsmith the feeling and emotions well - although in the clipped 1930's way.

Some copies are available for a few quid, some a lot more (~£100) but the words are the same so get a cheap one. It's not technical, not gung - ho, no heroics.
Last edited by mossie on Mon Mar 30, 2020 9:50 am, edited 1 time in total.
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By Rob L
#1753450
Nevil Shute, one of my favourite aviation writers, wrote in 1957 "On the Beach" ; a non-aviation story (but one that might entertain Bill McCarthy of this parish since it involves submarines) ISBN 9780099530251

It relates a fictional story of a worldwide epidemic (in his story it's radioactive) and the effect it has upon the remaining survivors.

It is surprisingly prophetic.
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By Rob L
#1753458
Dave W wrote:Good recommendation.

Shute of course has many other novels, many that do have an aviation theme or element. No Highway perhaps the most well known.


No Highway (ISBN 0 330 02072 2) was made into a film in the USA, I believe (edit:"No Highway in the Sky" 1951), but Shute's best known novel was A Town Like Alice, which had some minor aviation content, and was also made into a film in1956 starring Virginia McKenna.

[edit to add dates]
Last edited by Rob L on Wed Mar 18, 2020 11:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.