Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
#1809942
kanga wrote:Aaib reckons inadvertent touch of brake pedal while operating rudder at high speed, not specifically trained against :roll:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-m ... e-55005334

Oops.

I've been experimenting recently with my short field landing technique, and I've been practising braking after touchdown while the nose wheel is still off the ground, the objective being to keep it off even during the braking phase. Obviously, I do not let the nose wheel bang down even under braking.

It needs a fairly deft touch - I'd never try it in an aircraft I didn't know very well, and I can imagine it has the potential to go a bit pete tong.

Not sure I'd try it while holding straight with a bootful of rudder in a strong crosswind as well.... :shock: :shock:

Although.... I do like a challenge :)
#1810025
I would summarise this as:

  1. The normal nosewheel steering mechanism failed shortly after touchdown, switching the nosewheel to free castoring rather than being actively steered by the rudder control as normal. This was the root cause of the runway excursion, not pilot error.
  2. While differential braking would have worked and this detail was buried in the POH, it wasn't mentioned in the QRH, wasn't done at high speeds in training and so it didn't occur to the pilot to use it in the four seconds he had to react. They're fixing that.

As to why the nosewheel steering mechanism failed, it looks to me that this was investigated in some detail but seems inconclusive.
Ben K liked this
#1810039
The strength of a/c landing gear always amazes me :think all the crosswind landing vids on YouTube.

Even dragging our one tonne Arrow across soft grass via the noseleg /wheel axle towing point seems impossibly risky
#1810046
Oops.

I've been experimenting recently with my short field landing technique, and I've been practising braking after touchdown while the nose wheel is still off the ground, the objective being to keep it off even during the braking phase. Obviously, I do not let the nose wheel bang down even under braking.


What's the type, and does that result in a shorter landing than heavier braking with more weight on wheels?

Ian
#1810052
TopCat wrote:I've been experimenting recently with my short field landing technique, and I've been practising braking after touchdown while the nose wheel is still off the ground, the objective being to keep it off even during the braking phase. Obviously, I do not let the nose wheel bang down even under braking.

I can't see how that works at all.
During normal braking the only thing that stops the aircraft rotating about the centres of the main wheels is the nose-wheel being in contact with the ground. Any friction connection between the rolling wheels and the landing gear will cause the nose-wheel to drop, assisted by the CofG. I would imagine any aerodynamic load on the elevators by pulling the stick back would have minimal effect on counteracting the CofG and downward rotation caused by the slightest amount of braking.
Last edited by Boxkite on Sat Nov 21, 2020 12:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.