Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By Trent772
#1767086
Sort of serious post.

I frequently inhabit an airstrip where there are lots of gyros and flexwings and microlights. A very amiable and friendly lot.

When I asked about the cost I was rather stunned....

My word they seemed expensive, so I will stick to basic RV's... :mrgreen:
By Mutley
#1767088
You need to compare apples with apples. A brand new factory-built gyroplane is expensive compared to a used RV. A brand new factory-built gyroplane is expensive compared to an RV kit which you then need to spend a great deal of time (and a lot more money) building. A brand new factory-built gyroplane isn't expensive compared to a brand new factory-built aeroplane with an equivalent spec.
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By TyroGyro
#1767091
Open-cockpit factory-built tandems, second-hand from £30k; syndicates from about £10k, if you can find one.

That was an expensive prang in Czechia though. £130k ?
Last edited by TyroGyro on Wed May 06, 2020 6:44 pm, edited 3 times in total.
By Bill McCarthy
#1767100
There is a brand spanking new gyro sitting in a garage in Thurso - home built, Rotax engine, never flown, owner hasn’t got a license. Built with no expenses spared and a work of art, apparently.
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By Grelly
#1767103
Ok, you've inspired me to dig into my memories (and logbook) for my 3 lessons in a Bill Parsons Tandem Gyro - like the one below:

Image (hope that worked)

Probably the closest I have ever come to flying a broomstick.

On the subject of long take off runs, the technique in the Parsons was:
1. Use the pre-rotor which got the rotor spinning at something like 100 rpm
2. Simultaneously bring the stick fully back while advancing the throttle to full. This dangled the rotor in the prop wash and encouraged the rotor to spin up to about 200 rpm. Note that the propeller trying to move you forwards was cancelled out by the rotor wash trying to pull you backwards.
3. Slowly move the stick forward so you start to accelerate.

It was necessary to do all this slowly because while the rotor could take a certain amount of positive G, it couldn't take negative G. At all. And losing you rotor was a pretty terminal event.

It could stop on a sixpence though.

I'm sure that 20 years later, the modern autogyro has had most of its shortcomings reduced if not addressed.

I have to say, it was bloody brilliant fun. I'd recommend anyone to have a go. You will either get off at the end with a huge grin on your face, or a very urgent need to change your underwear. :D

G'wan. You know you want to.

Grelly
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By TyroGyro
#1767104
Bill McCarthy wrote:There is a brand spanking new gyro sitting in a garage in Thurso - home built, Rotax engine, never flown, owner hasn’t got a license. Built with no expenses spared and a work of art, apparently.


I think there are only 2 instructors in the UK who can train you in a single-seat homebuilt and, unsurprisingly, they are about as far away from Thurso as can be... :roll:
Last edited by TyroGyro on Fri May 08, 2020 4:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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By TyroGyro
#1767105
Grelly wrote:I'm sure that 20 years later, the modern autogyro has had most of its shortcomings reduced if not addressed.


Not half !
kanga, Grelly, Stu B liked this
By Bill McCarthy
#1767284
Regarding the unused auto gyro - I’ve found out it’s a RAF2000. Better left alone where it is.
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By TyroGyro
#1767299
Bill McCarthy wrote:Regarding the unused auto gyro - I’ve found out it’s a RAF2000. Better left alone where it is.


I wrongly imagined you were talking about a single-seat gyro.... :wink: Training in an RAF 2000 should be somewhat easier to find.

Apparently they fly OK with a better tail fitted with horizontal stabiliser. There are currently 31 on the UK register.

Image

His best bet is to contact my old gyro instructor at Inverness for advice. Although, of course, nothing is happening on the flying or training front at the moment...

Will Roomes at Highland Aviation, Inverness.

I also know that examiner/instructor/engineer Kev Whitehead at Perth (Alba Airsports) owned one for a while.
https://gyrocopterexperience.com/compon ... letter/955

These two guys should be able to sort your friend out. :thumright:
Last edited by TyroGyro on Fri May 08, 2020 4:37 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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By Charles Hunt
#1767304
skydriller wrote:Im afraid I giggled at the last clip where the rotor flys off... :oops:


You are not alone.

Another sad one was when were all at Saucats.

The owner loaded his pride and joy, secured it on the trailer, and drove off out of the airfield.

Under a very firm height restriction bar.

Probably the safest way to go for an insurance claim.
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By bodmin
#1838406
I’m sure most readers on this forum will have seen the extremely informative and well written article about Gyros in the March 21 issue of the LAA Magazine.

A lot of answers relating to modern gyros are in the article.

Learning to fly and owning an Autogyro is something that loads of pilots would like to do. It doesn’t have to be a final decision in life - fly them for a couple of years, then go back to fixed wing, flex wing, helicopters or whatever. The experience will be unforgettable.
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By Rob P
#1838430
Charles Hunt wrote:Another sad one was when were all at Saucats.


I'd forgotten that incident. I really felt for the bloke.

As I did for the one I saw fall out of the sky at Enstone, must have been around 1984. I can still 'see' that. It would take some persuading to get me to try one.

bodmin wrote: The experience will be unforgettable.


You can say that again :shock:

Rob P
Last edited by Rob P on Tue Apr 06, 2021 9:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
By JodelDavo
#1838440
I’d try it now, they seem to be a bit more professionally built.

And oh how I’d love to fly one of those Cierva/Kellett autogiros from the 1930s. Radial engine up front.
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