Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By peter272
#1745826
Very true. But as far as aviation is concerned, the UK doesn't appear to have a strong hand. The CAA know and is clear they can't take on the full range of EASA's activities, and don't want to. They are hoping the Govt sees sense and makes a special deal to remain within EASA as a third country.

That may well happen, but I won't hold my breath.
User avatar
By G-BLEW
#1745831
JulietTango wrote:Well we could charge EU airlines a toll for going through our airspace to get to the US. Oh wait, forgot about Chicago convention.


We do that already with airways charges.

Ian
User avatar
By SteveC
#1745833
peter272 wrote:Very true. But as far as aviation is concerned, the UK doesn't appear to have a strong hand. The CAA know and is clear they can't take on the full range of EASA's activities, and don't want to. They are hoping the Govt sees sense and makes a special deal to remain within EASA as a third country.

That may well happen, but I won't hold my breath.


And it’s not what the UK and EASA are planning on. I posted a link earlier.
User avatar
By PaulB
#1745923
Thinking about this, and if it does "badly" and we end up out of EASA....

If it was known that that was to be the outcome, then presumably various legal things would have to happen to remove all reference to EU legislation and enact it (presumably) in the ANO. This would be a significant undertaking. Does anyone have any inkling as to how long this might take? (I'm guessing there'd be some provision in the interim to accept EU law while these changes were being made.) Also some agreement with EASA would have to be made (as other regulators do)?

I'm guessing that there'd be similar situations with other EU bodies that we may cease to be members of.
User avatar
By skydriller
#1745931
PaulB wrote:If it was known that that was to be the outcome, then presumably various legal things would have to happen to remove all reference to EU legislation and enact it (presumably) in the ANO. This would be a significant undertaking. Does anyone have any inkling as to how long this might take? (I'm guessing there'd be some provision in the interim to accept EU law while these changes were being made.) Also some agreement with EASA would have to be made (as other regulators do)?

I'm guessing that there'd be similar situations with other EU bodies that we may cease to be members of.


Im pretty sure that what you are talking about is what the rest of this year is for... Its why some of us decided it was best to go through the hassle and expense of SOLI.

Regards, SD..
#1745946
'From this day on in all references to EASA shall be deemed to mean UK CAA'

13 Words.

Same as they have done with the word * * * * * * From 1/2/2020 that does not exist anymore, can not be used in written or spoken word, when you type it, it just auto-changes to * * * * * *

A straightforward decree by the PM.

:D
derekf liked this
By patowalker
#1745947
Bringing EU regulation into UK law
In an absence of UK-EU aviation safety agreements, a number of regulatory processes would need to exist within the UK system so that we are able to continue to regulate the UK aviation industry. We have been adjusting existing systems so that they can continue to work in exactly the same way as now – but with the UK Government and the CAA fulfilling regulatory functions independently of the EU.

Developing new functions and capabilities
Within this scenario, translating EU aviation law into UK law will require the CAA to take on new functions, some of which are currently delivered by EASA. The CAA has implemented plans to fulfil these functions should they be needed following the end of the transition period. As an example, the CAA has created the capability required for the UK to fulfil State of Design responsibilities independently of EASA should that be needed.


https://www.caa.co.uk/Our-work/About-us/Brexit/

https://www.easa.europa.eu/brexit-early-applications

It is currently foreseen that the transition period starting on 01 February 2020 ends on 31 December 2020. It can be extended once by up to one to two years. Such a decision must be taken jointly by the EU and United Kingdom before 01 July 2020.


https://www.easa.europa.eu/brexit
User avatar
By T67M
#1746007
Flyin'Dutch' wrote:'From this day on in all references to EASA shall be deemed to mean UK CAA'

13 Words.


That would work for using EASA paperwork (PPL, CofA etc) in geographic regions governed by the UK, if and when those words are written into the ANO by the UK Parliament.

It may or may not cover mainland Europe and/or other ICAO signatories, depending on the fine print which is yet to be written by others and over which we have little or no control.
User avatar
By PaulB
#1746011
T67M wrote:
Flyin'Dutch' wrote:'From this day on in all references to EASA shall be deemed to mean UK CAA'

13 Words.


That would work for using EASA paperwork (PPL, CofA etc) in geographic regions governed by the UK, if and when those words are written into the ANO by the UK Parliament.

It may or may not cover mainland Europe and/or other ICAO signatories, depending on the fine print which is yet to be written by others and over which we have little or no control.


I not sure that it would work.... the ANO and ROTA contain multiple mentions of Parts SERA, FCL, NCO, ORO and many others. All these would have to be added to the ANO. Much EU stuff is automatically law in the UK. If that was no longer the case then those EU regs would need enacting in UK law.
User avatar
By Gertie
#1746057
PaulB wrote:various legal things would have to happen to remove all reference to EU legislation and enact it (presumably) in the ANO

All already done, surely - isn't that what the "Great Repeal Act" was all about?
User avatar
By PaulB
#1746061
But that will have to change as it says we continue to take on EU laws, accept ECJ in certain areas. At some point that'll have to stop (if we're not going to be part of these EU agencies.)
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