Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By gaznav
#1743095
EASA’s mandate and role as an agency of the EU with regulatory and executive tasks in the field of civil aviation safety is not altered within the EU-28 and 4 associated countries until the UK’s withdrawal.

EASA’s tasks within the EU-27 and 4 associated countries will continue seamlessly beyond the UK’s withdrawal. The overall aims of EASA’s operations remain untouched by the UK withdrawal.

As the withdrawal and transitional agreement negotiations are currently underway EASA cannot yet determine the ultimate impact of the withdrawal on EASA or its stakeholders within the EU-27 and 4 associated countries or within the UK. The withdrawal will significantly alter EASA’s cooperation with UK authorities and will not leave EASA’s stakeholders untouched.


https://www.easa.europa.eu/brexit

Also, at paragraph 2 of the following: https://ec.europa.eu/info/sites/info/fi ... ety_en.pdf

Certificates issued before the withdrawal date by the competent authorities of the United Kingdom by virtue of the Basic Regulation and any relevant implementing or delegated acts will no longer be valid as of the withdrawal date in the EU. This concerns in particular:

Pilot licences, pilot medical certificates, certificates for pilot training organisations, certificates for aero-medical centres, certificates for flight simulation training devices, certificates for persons responsible for providing flight training, flight simulation training or assessing pilots' skill, and certificates for aero medical examiners, issued pursuant to Section II of Chapter III of the Basic Regulation;
Last edited by gaznav on Sat Jan 25, 2020 12:14 pm, edited 2 times in total.
By johnm
#1743099
Hmm as I'm off on holiday I won't have chance to read this, but it looks as if the withdrawal agreement and transition arrangements are a bit more distant than I had thought, but on the plus side the political declaration seems still to be in play. So I'm now less sure that we'll be working in EASA as before I must admit. I think @Flyin'Dutch' may have it right .
By patowalker
#1743106
PaulB wrote:Thanks guys. So now we know the link, will the UK have representation on EASA next Saturday?


What happens on 1 February 2020?

When the United Kingdom leaves the European Union on 31 January 2020, after full ratification of the Withdrawal Agreement, we will enter into the transition period. This time-limited period was agreed as part of the Withdrawal Agreement and will last until at least 31 December 2020. Until then, it will be business as usual for citizens, consumers, businesses, investors, students and researchers in both the EU and the United Kingdom. The United Kingdom will no longer be represented in the EU institutions, agencies, bodies and offices but EU law will still apply in the United Kingdom until the end of the transition period.


https://ec.europa.eu/commission/pressco ... NDA_20_104
By patowalker
#1743108
[quote="gaznav"
Also, at paragraph 2 of the following: https://ec.europa.eu/info/sites/info/fi ... ety_en.pdf

Certificates issued before the withdrawal date by the competent authorities of the United Kingdom by virtue of the Basic Regulation and any relevant implementing or delegated acts will no longer be valid as of the withdrawal date in the EU. This concerns in particular:

Pilot licences, pilot medical certificates, certificates for pilot training organisations, certificates for aero-medical centres, certificates for flight simulation training devices, certificates for persons responsible for providing flight training, flight simulation training or assessing pilots' skill, and certificates for aero medical examiners, issued pursuant to Section II of Chapter III of the Basic Regulation;
[/quote]

Why quote something dating back to January 2019? It is way out-of-date.
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By PaulB
#1743119
patowalker wrote:
PaulB wrote:Thanks guys. So now we know the link, will the UK have representation on EASA next Saturday?


What happens on 1 February 2020?

When the United Kingdom leaves the European Union on 31 January 2020, after full ratification of the Withdrawal Agreement, we will enter into the transition period. This time-limited period was agreed as part of the Withdrawal Agreement and will last until at least 31 December 2020. Until then, it will be business as usual for citizens, consumers, businesses, investors, students and researchers in both the EU and the United Kingdom. The United Kingdom will no longer be represented in the EU institutions, agencies, bodies and offices but EU law will still apply in the United Kingdom until the end of the transition period.


https://ec.europa.eu/commission/pressco ... NDA_20_104


So that would be no, then. Rule taking but not rule making for us.
johnm liked this
By johnm
#1743120
It should be easy to take the Swiss route, but the ECJ's role might be a stumbling block for us where it isn't for them or Norway :-(
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By tomshep
#1743157
The comment you just donked was not political. Insanity is insanity, irrespective of the cause.
It will be the aviation sector that will be the poorer for it but it is now too late to do anything about it so we shall just have to wait until G- reg aircraft are impounded for not having valid airworthiness/insurance / radio or other paperwork and British pilots are marched off to jail for arriving with invalid paperwork.
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By johnm
#1743163
tomshep wrote:The comment you just donked was not political. Insanity is insanity, irrespective of the cause.
It will be the aviation sector that will be the poorer for it but it is now too late to do anything about it so we shall just have to wait until G- reg aircraft are impounded for not having valid airworthiness/insurance / radio or other paperwork and British pilots are marched off to jail for arriving with invalid paperwork.


I think that the U.K. is still an ICAO State so this shouldn’t happen. What will happen is that U.K. engineer license holders can no longer service non G EASA aircraft and U.K. licenses will only be valid on G reg
derekf, Flyin'Dutch', SteveN liked this
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By PaulB
#1744725
It's being reported that Boris will be making a wide-ranging speech on Monday. One of the things he'll reportedly say is that he wants a deal with the EU where the ECJ has no jurisdiction over the UK.

Not sure how that will work with EASA membership?

Thoughts?

[
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By peter272
#1744735
well, put simply, either he goes against all advice from the CAA to align with EASA - as the CAA has said from day one- or he spends a shedload of dosh reconstituting the CAA of old.

It makes no sense to do the latter, but sense doesn't come into this, as macho posturing pays more dividends with the great unwashed
kanga, Stu B, Kemble Pitts and 2 others liked this
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