Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By TheFarmer
#1717527
I have two pairs of Sennheiser NoiseGard headsets in the aeroplane, and they’re not really very good in my opinion. They’re uncomfortable, the ANR is poor, and the audio quality seems really muffled.

So, I’ve decide to look into a couple of pairs of better headsets.

Apart from Bose (which seem to be really quite deer), are there any other options I should consider that’ll be a bit less expansive bit are just as good for P1 and P2 to use? They do need to be comfortable though.

Also, the Sennheisers have a third plug for ANR power (picture below). Is this a standard ANR power plug? Will Bose (and other types) come with this kind plug too? If so, that’s great as the aircraft has the female end of these installed in the panel.

Or am I better to go with battery powered ANR?


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By tomshep
#1717533
Yes, Battery powered ANR is best because they tend to have standard pluggage. Try other headsets though. Sennheiser ain't the most comfortable but they are very thorough indeed about getting good sound as I know having been on broadcast equipment training courses at their facilities. Consider if you are getting on a bit having your hearing checked out. You will start losing treble response before you are thirty and the cumulative effect of working with noisy machinery is quite surprising. In my opinion, it is not necessary to spend a thousand pounds. The converted David Clarks cost less than half of that and are well regarded.
By riverrock
#1717555
Unfortunately 3pin xlr isn't a standard way to power a headset. Might have just been Sennheiser who supplied headsets which did that.
You can see pin outs (etc) here: https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source= ... 7347515111
Easiest would be battery powered ANR and forget about this socket.

Alternatively you could make an adapter to combine power and signals into the more standard 5pin XLR (used on most airbus and Boeing aircraft), or could replace your 3 pin with a 5 pin socket (and feed the headset and mic signals into it).
#1717615
I spent a lot of time at the LAA rally on Friday trying on CEHT headsets and have pretty much convinced myself that when I upgrade from my present HM40s that is what I will have. Covering pretty much every point that either DC or Bose do, looking happily robust, working very well, and much cheaper.

G
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By PaulB
#1717630
I keep seeing good things said about CEHT
By manfieldmann
#1717647
Bought a new SEHT SH10-X headset last week. First use en route to the Rally on Friday.
Squelch was set correctly but the take off racket overcame it leading to a very noisy spell until the power was backed off.
Passenger was using Bose - we swapped headsets for a couple of minutes on the way back and the Bose is much quieter.
Aircraft is an RV9 with minimal upholstery.
I'm getting a Bose next week.
Nick liked this
#1717665
Just retired my oldest (1000+hrs used and still working fine) Zulu2 and replaced with a Zulu3 ... for no other reason than I wanted a spare headset just in case one of ours ever needs to go away for repair or servicing.

Both of our Zulu2 have proven to be brilliant bits of kit, needing only a pair of new AA batteries two or three times a year and the usual ear pads and headband replacing from time to time- in fact the only time I was without one of them was about 4.999 years into the five year warranty when I stupidly trapped and severed a wire when closing a canopy - to my surprise (and pleasure) it was repaired and returned to me FOC, even though I had sent it for repair with a note explaining the failure was entirely my fault and not in any way attributable to a manufacturing defect.

Superb service and was a major part of the decision to purchase another Lightspeed when the time came.
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By PaulSS
#1717673
I use the DC One X. Really good headset, in my opinion and is very comfortable to wear for extended periods. ANR maybe a teeny bit worse than the Bose but I think the build quality is better and I prefer not having to get a screwdriver out if I want to switch the microphone from left side to right side. It's also a fair bit cheaper than Bose.
Trent772 liked this
By simon32
#1717709
Charliesixtysix wrote:Just retired my oldest (1000+hrs used and still working fine) Zulu2 and replaced with a Zulu3 ... for no other reason than I wanted a spare headset just in case one of ours ever needs to go away for repair or servicing.
Both of our Zulu2 have proven to be brilliant bits of kit, needing only a pair of new AA batteries two or three times a year and the usual ear pads and headband replacing from time to time- in fact the only time I was without one of them was about 4.999 years into the five year warranty when I stupidly trapped and severed a wire when closing a canopy - to my surprise (and pleasure) it was repaired and returned to me FOC, even though I had sent it for repair with a note explaining the failure was entirely my fault and not in any way attributable to a manufacturing defect.
Superb service and was a major part of the decision to purchase another Lightspeed when the time came.


I did the same, and the Zulu 3 has some good features, like helpfully flexible, kevlar-reinforced cords, larger headcups for greater comfort and a better designed carrying case making them easier to put away.
Simon
Shoestring Flyer liked this
#1717715
My thoughts are that ok there are some cheap chinese ANR headsets around but what happens when they need the earseals or headband replacing a couple of years down the line, will bits and service be available?
I would say pay the intial higher price and stick with the main ANR brands, Lightspeed/Bose or DC and get long life and service when needed.
Personally I am still very happy with my 10year old Lightspeed Zulus which are brilliant. Zulus fit my ears better than Bose.