Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By matthew_w100
#1711322
The AA are pushing a wizzy new app where you stab a button on your mobile phone and it summons uniformed assistance to your precise (GPS) location. Is there, or should there be, something similar for us gentle(wo)men of the air?
By johnm
#1711326
I assumed that since the AA clearly cover spaceships aircraft were a given :D
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By Flyingfemme
#1711344
That’s fine where mobile coverage is good. For other areas you need a satellite unit - which is already available.
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By Stu B
#1711351
A PLB should still work if it gets dunked in the water during a ditching, your phone will not!
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By Paul_Sengupta
#1711354
I can't imagine the cellular service being that great when bobbing around in the sea half way to Cherbourg either. :D

But yes, a D&D app might be an idea. There could be different severity levels for calling for different sorts of help, from "Just letting you know I'm down ok" to "Please send the air ambulance"...
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By Martinbguk
#1711391
Can I assume that you all already know this?
If you don't have a signal on your mobile to get "999", dial "112"
The handset will then choose the strongest mobile signal, hijack it and use it.
The "112" service can also locate you to within a much smaller search area if you are "unsure of your position"

That is all...
By riverrock
#1711394
Martinbguk wrote:Can I assume that you all already know this?
If you don't have a signal on your mobile to get "999", dial "112"
The handset will then choose the strongest mobile signal, hijack it and use it.
The "112" service can also locate you to within a much smaller search area if you are "unsure of your position"

That is all...

That is BS in the UK.
112 and 999 are identical in the UK in all aspects.
http://www.mountainsafety.co.uk/EP-999- ... -Best-aspx
By Martinbguk
#1711395
"That is BS in the UK."
not according to my sources who were highly trained special forces medics. we shall agree to disagree.
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By Genghis the Engineer
#1711448
Martinbguk wrote:"That is BS in the UK."
not according to my sources who were highly trained special forces medics. we shall agree to disagree.


Your sources are wrong.

I've dialled 999 in a field in the middle of nowhere on my smartphone after an engine failure and forced landing. There was apparently no phone signal.

The phone screen just said "Emergency Number", and by some clever mechanism connected me directly to the emergency operator.

G
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By Paul_Sengupta
#1711456
Yep, 999 and 112 are the same. Depending on the operator and the phone, you might find that 911 works as well. Cover all bases! ;-)

It may just be possible that some foreign phones don't recognise 999 as an emergency number, but I would have thought most would.
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By PaulB
#1711459
What I'd read (admittedly years ago) was that in the case of a network being engaged (or fully used or whatever the terminology is) that 112 would disconnect an existing call to enable the emergency call to happen whereas 999 would not.

Was that ever the case? I assume from what Paul S says that it isn't the case now?

So... If I dial 999 or 112 now:-

- will the handset jump networks if it needs to?

- would an existing call be disconnected to allow the emergency call or would the emergency call get an engaged tone?