Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By JAFO
#1702813
I'm all for supporting those who support us and have been an AOPA member as well as an LAA member. I was wondering, though, why is it £99 to join AOPA in the UK and $59 (£46.47) to join AOPA? Does anybody know?
By johnm
#1702838
AOPA in the US has around 400,000 members which should give a clue......
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By Flyin'Dutch'
#1702840
Both AOPA US and AOPA UK are part of IAOPA.

As others have already stated they are very different organisation and if you sub to AOPA US you get a great magazine and a fantastic website but unless you fly a lot in the States on an FAA ticket your benefits are more or less done beyond that.

If you support AOPA UK you get a magazine and representation in the UK (and I think Europe) which is of course good news.

Other organisations such as the LAA, BGA, BMAA etc provide that too (representation in the UK and Europe) both as individual members but also as part of pan European organisations.

Their fees are less than the of AOPA UK.

AOPA UK used to have a medical adviser for their members as far as I know they no longer have one.

The BGA and LAA have one which provides free medical advice to members and who represents them at EASA level.

Main thing is to be a member of at least 1 so you contribute to the lobbying at the right level and are represented.
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By PeteSpencer
#1702843
JAFO wrote:I'm all for supporting those who support us and have been an AOPA member as well as an LAA member. I was wondering, though, why is it £99 to join AOPA in the UK and $59 (£46.47) to join AOPA? Does anybody know?


Oh gawd, not this age-old whinge again.
Get a life....

Peter(AOPA member 27 years)
By johnm
#1702846
RisePilot wrote:I’ve previously been an AOPA US member, but never joined AOPA UK (though I live in London). If AOPA UK wishes to increase membership, offering half as much at twice the price is not the best business model or proposition.


Oh for pity's sake. :roll: That is not the point :roll: AOPA US has more than 10 times the total number of private pilots in the UK as its membership. Its role is not membership benefits but working with other European and international AOPAs to guard against erosion of our privileges.
User avatar
By RisePilot
#1702850
If it’s just a lobbying body with no other discernible benefit, just say so - be intellectually honest.

Being a helicopter pilot, not much of their lobbying even directly relates. Private helicopter pilots aren’t really involved involved re discussions of IR, medical declaration or really any license other than a full EASA PPL.

I’m one person, so negligible in their overall membership numbers, however I don’t foresee better for them unless they adapt/change their offering and perception.

Think about this query; what is the average age of an AOPA UK member?
User avatar
By Flyin'Dutch'
#1702851
RisePilot wrote:Think about this query; what is the average age of an AOPA UK member?


I think that the 'average profile' of all things GA is mid-fifties, white, male.
User avatar
By JAFO
#1702870
PeteSpencer wrote:
JAFO wrote:I'm all for supporting those who support us and have been an AOPA member as well as an LAA member. I was wondering, though, why is it £99 to join AOPA in the UK and $59 (£46.47) to join AOPA? Does anybody know?


Oh gawd, not this age-old whinge again.
Get a life....
R
Peter(AOPA member 27 years)


Peter, not a whine but a question. You can tell that by the question marks. Thanks for the advice, though and congratulations on the longevity of your long membership.
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By nickwilcock
#1702894
If you support AOPA UK you get a magazine and representation in the UK (and I think Europe) which is of course good news.


Correct. AOPA (UK) is represented at EASA, as are all other AOPAs, through the Agency's recognition of IAOPA (Europe). Not just EASA Member States, but in fact the interests of some 31 European nations.

The President of IAOPA (Europe) nominates who shall best represent the Association at various EASA meetings or on certain EASA Committees.

For example, on Tue / Wed of this coming week, I will be representing IAOPA (Europe) at the 'Workshop on Ex Post Evaluation of Rules on Pilot Training, Testing and Checking'.

Another little known advantage of AOPA (UK) membership is that, due to mutual trust with the CAA, we are frequently able to solve members' queries quite quickly. In fact we can often resolve a query rather than it being sent to join the quivering in-tray of fclweb, particularly when the Authority is bogged down by contingency planning for a non-negotiated UK/EU exit. Regrettably, much of the 'advice' posted on websites is either out of date or just plain wrong - and many instructors and examiners aren't a great deal of use either, I'm sad to relate.

We have recently introduced a monthly payment option, so that the cost of annual membership doesn't have to be met all at once.

It was good to meet so many members at Aero Expo who clearly valued the work we do protecting the GA interest.

And it costs less per week than half a pint of beer or one of those lattemochafrappacino froth and hot water things that seem so popular these days!
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By kanga
#1702974
I belong both to AOPA and to LAA, mostly out of a sense of obligation to support their efforts on behalf of all of us; and still do although I've 'hung up my headset'. I belong to Skywatch (now only as Supporter rather than Pilot) for similar reasons. I understand the question "what's in it for me at this price ?", but that is not my personal mindset. Each to their own .. :roll:

My direct benefits have, I suppose, been the magazines (although articles in the AOPA one often reflect a skygodliness far removed from my sort of flying), and reduced entry at the Rally in the case of LAA. I have very occasionally had occasion to find useful my AOPA photo aircrew card.
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