Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
#1702757
Today I received the CAA's decision on my medical condition (I have mild spinal stenosis). It's partly good news in that I can have a class 2 medical for flying solo but if I want to take a passenger then I need a safety pilot. This is as much use as a chocolate teapot as the safety pilot may as well take the passenger on his or her own and, in any case, this is useless for my own aircraft unless I can make it a three-seater! The safety pilot limitation is, according to the CAA, in case I become incapacitated due to high G-force such as a hard landing. I'd have thought that any landing hard enough for that would mean the end of the flight anyway.

Of greater importance to me is that it also destroys my ambition of becoming an FI. Being just one exam away from completing CPL theory makes it even more of a blow.

What I can't find out is whether I have the right to appeal this decision and, if so, how do I go about it? Does anybody know, please?
Last edited by jaycee58 on Fri Sep 06, 2019 2:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
#1702765
Thank you, Dodo. Don't know why I couldn't find that. The procedure doesn't look quick, easy or cheap.

My stenosis is cervical. I'm pretty much asymptotic at the moment as well apart from a slight "altered sensation" in the area of my collarbone. I thought that telling my AME would result in nothing more than it being noted on my records, especially as my GP just sort of shrugged his shoulders as said "live with it" and my consultant said "your spine is actually fairly normal for a 61 year old". I clearly couldn't have been more wrong :( .
#1702768
If you have a driver licence unrestricted by the DVLA then that’s a good starting point.

Backs are as you know tricky and my area of knowledge is with Scoliosis caused by Arachnoiditis. Nevertheless, centres of excellence such as the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital must be able to give expert opinion.

Maybe worth a consultation?
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#1702778
OP, you need to be clear who has actually made the decision. If it was indeed the CAA medical department on secondary review then the original link I posted is the correct one but the appeal route should have been mentioned in the official letter.

If it was your AME, even if he or she was acting on the advice of the CAA medical department or following their published guidance material then the process is here
https://www.caa.co.uk/uploadedFiles/CAA ... al%202.pdf

Either way if you haven't already commissioned a detailed report from an orthopaedic specialist in line with https://www.caa.co.uk/WorkArea/Download ... 4294973698 then you might wish to do so.

DOI retired AME, (in fact so retired I am no longer even a registered medical practitioner), and out of the loop for the last year or two so this advice may be outdated, or just plain wrong. (FD may be along in a bit to correct me).
#1702779
The letter has come directly from the CAA at Gatwick and is signed by a Medical Assessor, Safety and Airspace Regulation Group. I'm not sure if it's a secondary review (there's no mention of it) but no appeal route has been mentioned whatsoever. I'll have to see my AME to renew the class 2 so I can also ask him what options are available but thank you for the links.

I am seeing my consultant again in a couple of weeks and will give him the guidance material though I really don't know what he can say that will help me. As I said, I have little in the way of symptoms and am not taking (or needing) any medication.

Thank you also to Cloudhound for your suggestion. I'm currently being seen by a consultant at Guys Hospital in London as I was able to be referred there via the Dreadnought Seafarers Hospital Service but I guess there's no harm in looking elsewhere for another opinion.

I really hope there is a way out of this. I know it's hardly the end of the world but I chucked in my day job last year purely to become an FI. Little did I know how difficult that was about to become. At the moment I really do feel absolutely gutted by the CAA's decision.
#1702786
I'm not competent to discuss medical matters, so won't.

But if you can get an NPPL medical, which presumably you can? I think that you can do FI(microlight). That is real instructing, in good modern aeroplanes, and actually pays a little better. I know plenty of people who have enjoyed long and successful careers as microlight FIs.

G
#1702789
Genghis the Engineer wrote:I'm not competent to discuss medical matters, so won't.

But if you can get an NPPL medical, which presumably you can? I think that you can do FI(microlight). That is real instructing, in good modern aeroplanes, and actually pays a little better. I know plenty of people who have enjoyed long and successful careers as microlight FIs.

G


That's something I will definitely be looking into. My airfield has a fleet of C42's (lovely aircraft) and the microlight school are in need of instructors. I have zero microlight P1 time so it would take a while as I'd have to get 40 hours behind me before I could do the course but I'd be very happy if I was able to do that. I'm currently a CRI and I'm not at all sure that I can do any CRI stuff such as rating revalidation or LAPL one hour training etc, club currency check flights etc. I realise I couldn't do rating renewal training, tailwheel conversions and that sort of thing.

I'm also not at all sure if I can get round the safety pilot limitation with either an NPPL medical or a medical declaration (I don't appear to be disqualified from having one) if I wished to take a passenger in my own aeroplane. However I suspect I may be limited by the ANO's general requirement "to not suffer from any medical condition", even though this is surely the reason a lot of pilots take the declaration route?

It's all a bit of a minefield by the looks of it.
#1702797
Sorry to read this John. Who over the age of 50 doesn't have some medical condition or another they manage?

Just seems OTT to me, and certainly worth challenging, you've come too far to not fight for it.

Don't dismiss the microlight instructor option if that remains open, them upstairs are getting a tailwheel Scout soon and you've got more tailwheel time than Gary!
#1702809
Genghis the Engineer wrote:I'm not competent to discuss medical matters, so won't.

But if you can get an NPPL medical, which presumably you can? I think that you can do FI(microlight). That is real instructing, in good modern aeroplanes, and actually pays a little better. I know plenty of people who have enjoyed long and successful careers as microlight FIs.

G


I didn't think the NPPL medical declaration existed now? Self Declare, or LAPL medical