Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
#1702753
Irv Lee wrote:Back issues for a small number of years at about 4-ish per year , should be on airspacesafety.com somewhere

Not immediately, however on the reader displayed, the 4 squares top left give you the previous editions.
#1703205
The ability to use a version with 'bottom right hand corner page turning' appears to depend upon computer types and browsers....

I've informed the CAA about this; they have also advised me that a .pdf version is in course of production.
townleyc liked this
#1703746
Have they done away with the paper copies without my noticing?

I always thought it a good bedtime read(When the experts say we shouldn't be subjecting our brains to white screen light if we want
a restful night's sleep).

Peter
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By defcribed
#1703794
Irv Lee wrote:...clearly unsuitable 1960s raf "nav techniques"...


Oh come come now Irv, I think you're being a bit over-generous ascribing these techniques to as late a period as the 1960s!

In the first half of WW2 British scientific intelligence was telling the RAF that dead reckoning was no good as a method of accurate navigation. They didn't listen, despite the Butt Report revealing that most of their bombers got nowhere near their targets. They continued to resist the development and introduction of radio-based precision bombing aids (they didn't need them apparently) and generally thought that they knew best. Of course, they didn't.

It's an interesting parallel with the CAAs attitude to GPS half a century later, and the two organisations are not exactly unrelated. Old attitudes die hard, it seems.

Most Secret War by R V Jones is an excellent read.
Last edited by defcribed on Thu Jul 04, 2019 10:26 am, edited 1 time in total.
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By Irv Lee
#1703798
@defcribed Perhaps I meant seniors out of the 1960s intake! I stand corrected on the decade!
Now you say the CAA was the problem, I would say otherwise- the CAA brought out a leaflet on GPS in the first half of the noughties, i know because the staff examiner (a very decent chap, still around the flying scene i think) who did it came up to me and said he had used my 2001 articles in Flyer to help form his opinions... no cheque arrived mind you. In many contacts with caa in many different ways over say 15 years, and NEVER heard anything about being anti GPS training for ppls. On the other hand, I attended more than one AOPA instructor seminars in the noughties... I clearly have my own personal ideas as to who was rabidly anti GPS and who wasn't.
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By defcribed
#1703807
Irv Lee wrote:@defcribed Perhaps I meant seniors out of the 1960s intake! I stand corrected on the decade!
Now you say the CAA was the problem, I would say otherwise- the CAA brought out a leaflet on GPS in the first half of the noughties, i know because the staff examiner (a very decent chap, still around the flying scene i think) who did it came up to me and said he had used my 2001 articles in Flyer to help form his opinions... no cheque arrived mind you. In many contacts with caa in many different ways over say 15 years, and NEVER heard anything about being anti GPS training for ppls. On the other hand, I attended more than one AOPA instructor seminars in the noughties... I clearly have my own personal ideas as to who was rabidly anti GPS and who wasn't.


Safety Sense Leaflet 25 (from 2009) remains current.

It is mostly about things that can go wrong with GPS. The tone is not exactly positive, and it says that GPS is only an aid to other forms of navigation.

What would make me happy you ask? Well, I'd like them to publish a new Safety Sense Leaflet that basically says:

    GPS, certified or not, is the best possible tool you can use to navigate
    If you aren't using one then start now
    Definitely don't go near controlled airspace without one
Flyin'Dutch' liked this
By patowalker
#1703808
defcribed wrote:In the first half of WW2 British scientific intelligence was telling the RAF that dead reckoning was no good as a method of accurate navigation.


Ah, but dead reckoning, or was it off-course navigation, worked for Francis Chichester, and he was the Chief Navigation Instructor at the Central Flying School. :wink:
Last edited by patowalker on Thu Jul 04, 2019 11:48 am, edited 1 time in total.