Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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#1749361
After much pontification, I've decided to come clean over the kettle.

The element failed about 4 years ago, I said to the good lady put it up there and I'll get a new element and fit it.

After about 3 days she ordered a new one on line and the broken one has remained in situ.

I'll fix it one day. :oops: :oops:

G-JWTP
#1755914
Been home since Tuesday morning and now starting to get a bit bored.

So I thought I'd bung up the Forum server with,

'The Duffers Guide to Wings.'

So we'll start at the beginning. We need wing ribs, These are bits of metal ( I know some are other materials but as I'm building a metal aeroplane it is as I see it), that attach to the spar ( big heavy thing in the middle) and give the wing shape and strength and hold the skin on.
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So when you've found it you have to remove the blue sticky stuff, this is excellent fun for the first 20 parts but soon becomes a bore!
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Right, with that out of the way you can get onto the good bit, by following the build manual and drilling/dimpling or lopping bit off as is necessary.
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Next is the deburring. This is when you remove all the tiny bits of metal that you cannot see but will give you a very nasty cut should you run your finger along an edge. Generally you use this but there is all manor of widgets available to achieve a nice edge. I suggest you do this before fluting ( more about that later). Do it the wrong way round and you'll see why!!
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When you have finished this you will see that the rib has a rather nice bend in it and it needs to be flat.
Fluting, this is where you use a special set of pliers to bend the bit that sticks up to remove the excess metal. As if by magic the rib bends. You use a very old gauge to get this right. Its called a straight edge and a good eye, still after about 5 you generally get the knack.
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Onwards!!

Now the contentious bit.
Since this is the ' Duffers Guide' this is my way!

You then use maroon scotchbite ( buy the big box of it as you do use a lot) and abrade the rib using acetone as a solvent. This is biblically amusing as if you do this indoors you get pretty high. The scratches on the metal actually give the bright shiny surface a good key.
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This should have got rid of the remainder of the blue sticky stuffs glue and the red ink that goes through the plastic, as if by magic. But left behind is the aluminium powder and some small bits of maroon scotchbrite.
So, it's time to use a special detergent, nothing to do with fairies, with more scotchbrite, to clean all of the aluminium. Rinse with clean water.
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The shame is that at this point the aluminium looks pretty awful!
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So back to basics wipe the rib and leave to dry.
Lastly you have to dress up like some sort of ' Porton Down' escapee and retire into your spay room and turn the rib green.
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Having done all of this you are ready!!
You can now look to your organised workshop and notice that you will have to go through the same pa-larva 51 more times.
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I've come to this momentous decision.

If I decide to go through this again firstly I'm moving to Arizona.
It's warm . Mrs P. likes that
It's close to the skiing in New Mexico we both like that.
I'wont have to faff about with primer which no one will ever see!!

G-JWTP
Last edited by G-JWTP on Fri Mar 27, 2020 4:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
kanga, Charles Hunt liked this
#1755932
Bill McCarthy wrote:Buy some green socks so that you don’t end up with green spots on your white ones - through the holes in the “crocs” !


What does one do when the holes in the shoes marry up to the holes in the socks?
#1755938
Tell us what primer you're using and how you identify the parts after the degreaser has removed the original numbers.

These questions have nothing to do with the tailcone and empennage parts in my garage, which have been waiting 5 years to be primed. :)
#1755943
patowalker wrote:Tell us what primer you're using and how you identify the parts after the degreaser has removed the original numbers.

These questions have nothing to do with the tailcone and empennage parts in my garage, which have been waiting 5 years to be primed. :)


Aerowave 2001.

It's funny you get to recognise the bits and pieces as you go if you go through in a small logical way.

If I have to match drill stuff then disassemble I use a small engraver to mark and identify the parts that match together. It's still visable through the primer.

G-JWTP
patowalker liked this
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