Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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#1756059
patowalker wrote:Tell us what primer you're using and how you identify the parts after the degreaser has removed the original numbers.

These questions have nothing to do with the tailcone and empennage parts in my garage, which have been waiting 5 years to be primed. :)


What are you building?
and why the delay?

G-JWTP
#1756071
An RV-12. I got de-motivated when a family member fell ill and never got back to it. Now is probably a good time to resurrect the project. I had planned to have the parts primed at a car paint shop (for £40 p/h in 2015) and built 2 chicken-wire frames, as used at CZAW and Evektor factories, to lay the parts on for spraying.
Do have the space available to build a spray booth, but wonder if it i worth it, especially when I have no experience of spray painting.

I have previously built a Zenair CH601UL, Sport Cruiser and Eurostar, but the parts came primed or anodized and the final coats were done professionally.
#1756214
G-JWTP wrote:
patowalker wrote:Tell us what primer you're using and how you identify the parts after the degreaser has removed the original numbers.

These questions have nothing to do with the tailcone and empennage parts in my garage, which have been waiting 5 years to be primed. :)


Aerowave 2001.

It's funny you get to recognise the bits and pieces as you go if you go through in a small logical way.

If I have to match drill stuff then disassemble I use a small engraver to mark and identify the parts that match together. It's still visable through the primer.

G-JWTP


I've just heard from mission control that it's not advisable to engrave. Either use tags or permanent marker.

You learn something new every day.

Thanks Jerry!

G-JWTP
aerofurb liked this
#1756219
patowalker wrote:An RV-12. I got de-motivated when a family member fell ill and never got back to it. Now is probably a good time to resurrect the project. I had planned to have the parts primed at a car paint shop (for £40 p/h in 2015) and built 2 chicken-wire frames, as used at CZAW and Evektor factories, to lay the parts on for spraying.
Do have the space available to build a spray booth, but wonder if it i worth it, especially when I have no experience of spray painting.

I have previously built a Zenair CH601UL, Sport Cruiser and Eurostar, but the parts came primed or anodized and the final coats were done professionally.


I thought early on prior to starting that I would get a professional sprayer to prime and paint the external and visible surfaces. I am doing the rest.

As I've said before the only spray equipment previously used was deodorant. I'ts true, but I thought I'd have a go.

The first couple of ribs in the tail were awful. But then who is going to see them. It has improved dramatically since turning down the paint and the air pressure at the gun.

The Aerowave is expensive, but forgiving, being water based, I keep a big bucket of water and a sponge handy so I can wash off what I don't want, if you're quick.

Also the clean up is a doddle and you can paint over small scratches with a brush.

Come on!!
Crack On !!
:D :D :D

G-JWTP.
patowalker liked this
#1756224
G-JWTP wrote:I've just heard from mission control that it's not advisable to engrave. Either use tags or permanent marker.

Section 5 of the Van's Construction Manual deals with techniques and processes. (Available online for free) It does explicitly say that using an engraver is a stress raiser and can result in cracks later in life. If you've done it already, they'll recommend you polish it out.

A permanent marker under a thin layer of primer does work well, although write with exaggerated clarity as the marker can bleed with some primers.
G-JWTP liked this
#1756250
G-JWTP wrote:...(heavy snip by RobL)
Image


I recognise the 3M Scotchbrite wheel on the left; what make of flapper wheel on the right? I like the look of that!

With such low-inertia wheels on both sides, do you notice dramatic reduction in rpm during use?
(On my Scotchbrite "grinder", I have a big heavy coarse grinding wheel to provide some rotational inertia)
Rob
#1756254
Ha!!

Its a scotchbrite wheel,

The brushes enable you to get into the most awkward of corners as in wing ribs and also deburr holes.

I use it more than the one on the left.

https://www.cromwell.co.uk/shop/abrasiv ... te%20wheel

The big heavy coarse grinding wheel is behind the unit.

' Rotational inertia ? It tonks round at a hell of a lick' Hows that for SI units!

G-JWTP
Rob L, Dave W liked this
#1756258
G-JWTP wrote:Ha!!

Its a scotchbrite wheel,

The brushes enable you to get into the most awkward of corners as in wing ribs and also deburr holes.

I use it more than the one on the left.

https://www.cromwell.co.uk/shop/abrasiv ... te%20wheel

The big heavy coarse grinding wheel is behind the unit.

' Rotational inertia ? It tonks round at a hell of a lick' Hows that for SI units!

G-JWTP


Thanks! You learn a new thing every day.
Cromwell are around the corner from me (although closed at the moment). I will get one when they are allowed to reopen.
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