Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
#1693512
I asked how many golf courses he knew of being closed down to make room for more housing? As far as I know this has never happened….

Boysnope Golf Course immediately west of Barton.

Bought by Peel Holdings and shut down in 2017. Housing will be it's fate but not for many years.
#1693520
According to 2017 figures just 5.9% of land is "built on".
56.7% is farmland, 34.9% is natural, 2.5% is green urban.
(https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-41901294)

That means there is an awful lot of the country to build houses well away from the current congested areas instead of worsening the congestion.
Remote garden villages would not be worthwhile for the property developer trying to maximise profit unless the houses are sufficiently spacious and luxurious to attract the very rich people.
It would need to be very large towns and probably a central government policy (or a whole new bunch of newly elected local councillors?) and investment scheme to make it happen.

It was not long ago that the national news was saying how many thousands of trees need planting every year to offset the pollution from the general population stuck in traffic jams etc. Why not use this as one of the reasons to start a fresh and really spread out the new build housing developments so that new builds do not add to the misery of congestion and unemployment in already over congested areas.

With so much non-"built on" land, they should be able to find enough space to give the golf courses and airfields a wide berth :wink:
AshleyFlynn23 liked this
#1693646
A good place to provide homes for people to live in are town centres. There are thousands of sites across the country where dead town centres could be regenerated with affordable homes. Not everyone wants to live in the country.

London is in effect a lot of town centres many of which are now vibrant communities.
#1693658
CloudHound wrote:London is in effect a lot of town centres many of which are now vibrant communities.


That those earning normal/average salaries can't afford to live in....

(but yes, the general point is well made....)
#1693716
CloudHound wrote:A good place to provide homes for people to live in are town centres. There are thousands of sites across the country where dead town centres could be regenerated with affordable homes. Not everyone wants to live in the country.

London is in effect a lot of town centres many of which are now vibrant communities.


Yes and which part of the country is the worst for traffic congestion, overcrowding and pollution? London and the surrounding towns for the commuters that cannot afford to live in London or would like to live somewhere with more green space and fresher air.

Some people love London and some want to be there if they could afford it. Agree not everyone wants to live in the countryside or a town/city centre.

Regeneration in itself would work better in the long term if there was not a growing population that is getting older and the eventual mobility and health issues that many get with old age. The new housing capacity from regeneration would run out eventually with population growth so there still needs to be new houses elsewhere.

My suggestion is to spread out the towns a lot lot further so that they can have their own local economy and jobs and the facilities of other well established towns,. Then as the new towns grow they do not merge into the transport mess that we have in London and the surrounding commuter belt of south east England that is a growing misery to some people resulting in objections to new housing in their local vicinity and commuter/school routes.

Alternative, take a big step and build a new city. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-31874886
The Egyptian government has announced plans to build a new capital to the east of the present one, Cairo.

Housing Minister Mostafa Madbouly said the project would cost $45bn (£30bn) and take five to seven years to complete.

He said the aim was to ease congestion and overpopulation in Cairo over the next 40 years.


It will be interesting to see what effect that has. I have not read the Egyptian plan, but there was no mention on the news of a need to build houses over airfields.... why bother with a number of "garden villages" when the housing demand can fill a new city? :wink: