Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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#1732080
Katamarino wrote:
Bill McCarthy wrote:I’ve heard that it’s best not to worry about debris - unless it’s got a serial number on it !!


The chunk that seems to have vanished out the side of the cam lobe gives me pause for thought!


Has any debris turned up in the oil filter or the sump, because thats is a big piece of a cam lobe to be flying around inside your engine.
#1732236
I spoke to the shop just now. They are finishing the tear down but say that the metal came from a failing starter adapter, not the camshaft. They've said that the camshaft can use a hand lap in two places but is otherwise fine to go back in to the engine and carry me to TBO, which was interesting.

They didn't say anything about that weird section of the cam lobe. I shall have to ask them. Could it be that it's supposed to look like that...?
#1732241
Katamarino wrote:I spoke to the shop just now. They are finishing the tear down but say that the metal came from a failing starter adapter, not the camshaft. They've said that the camshaft can use a hand lap in two places but is otherwise fine to go back in to the engine and carry me to TBO, which was interesting.

They didn't say anything about that weird section of the cam lobe. I shall have to ask them. Could it be that it's supposed to look like that...?


Could well be the normal shape of the lobe as the angle which maybe missing is very uniform, but from the picture the polished area of the lobe were the lifter touches the cam is not central which to me is not normal.

However I personally haven't seen a camshaft lobe that shape before, maybe compare it with other lobes to see if they are all the same.
#1732418
Hard to tell what state the cam lobe is in from just one photo (or even if a bit is missing) - photos can be deceiving and I would hope the guys on site are in a position to evaluate condition of the items much better than we can.

For interest though, this is what a badly damaged O-360 cam and follower can look like.
The engine was reported running OK but with low compression on cyl no.2, which is why it came in for further investigation. .... I suspect it was withdrawn from service non-too soon and wouldn’t have lasted much longer.

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#1741939
The engine is back on. 6 new cylinders, new pistons, new bearings, new oil cooler, new camshaft, various other new bits and pieces. Overhauled mags, and various ADs complied with, including NDT on the crankshaft.

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Next tasks will be engine run-in, and HF radio install for the Pacific.

Coming soon will be the write-up of the flying around Australia in a rented Cessna 206 while the 182 was down.
nallen, Dave W, PeteSpencer and 7 others liked this
#1742024
Katamarino wrote:"Dead".

Seems a very, ummmm, short word from an Australian engineer, in the circumstances. ;) :twisted:

(But forum-friendly. So there's that. :D)
Katamarino, Hooligan liked this
#1743615
About time I started this up again...

I touched down at Sydney airport, and after a short wait was on a tiny Rex airplane out to the city of Albury, New South Wales, where the rental 206 was based. I walked straight around to the aviation business of the owner, Stephen, and we jumped in the aircraft to do a quick flight checkout as I’d not flown a 206 before. It was not at all difficult to get the hang of, being very similar indeed to the 182. After a bit of airwork and a few landings, all done in low visibility due to the smoke from the active bushfires nearby, Stephen gave me a lift to my hotel where I met up with my brother and his friend Jen. They had been on a road trip for the past couple of weeks through southeastern Australia, ending up here to join me for the flying.

Downtown Albury
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That evening we wandered out of the hotel and found a well reviewed Indian restaurant, which was exceptional. It’s always a treat to find Indian food done in the style that we’re used to in the UK, even if it’s not authentically Indian! We settled in for early nights, as the next day would bring the first of many early starts to come.

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I met Rowan and Jen at breakfast in the hotel, followed by Jen driving us out to the airport. Our Australian pilot Ollie had had his flight to Albury delayed, and was now arriving this morning rather than the previous night. Rowan, Jen and I went to the supermarket to some water and snacks to stock the 206 while Ollie stayed behind and completed a quick check flight with Stephen.

At Albury, ready to go
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We then prepared the aircraft for departure. We’d had one of the rear seats removed to provide more luggage space, and everybody was traveling light (Rowan had significantly reduced his luggage volume after an initial check the previous night), so loading didn’t present a problem. After grabbing a couple of extra headsets, the four of us jumped on board and taxied out for departure.

Dry land outside Albury. No surprise that the place was burning.
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Our first flight took us from Albury, north across New South Wales to Maitland. After takeoff we were held at low level because of incoming traffic, which was a hot and bumpy experience; there was a heat wave across Australia at the time, and temperatures had exceeded 40 degrees C at times. Visibility was still poor thanks to the widespread bush fires across the state; we’d had to check carefully to ensure our route did not interfere at all with any restricted areas for firefighting operations.

All aboard the 206
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Fires were visible all over
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Visibility over the Blue Mountains was poor
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Still technically VFR though!
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Eventually, we were given clearance to climb up to 9,000ft where it was much cooler and smoother. The visibility improved a little as we went, as well. The countryside below us was dry and parched, and it was plain to see why the bush fires were hitting the region so hard. Every now and then a fire could be seen, sending up huge plumes of white smoke; at times, visibility was almost down to the minimum for VFR flight. Maitland itself had fairly good weather, and approach and landing was straightforward, after two and a half hours in the air. We refueled, and then met up with my Aunt Janet who had very kindly collected some essential supplies from the C182, and brought them to us; things like my flying headset!

Parked up at Albury
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We had a quick lunch at McDonald’s, and returned to the aircraft. On the way we ran into David, the owner of the maintenance facility that was looking after the 182, and received an update on progress.

Day one route
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The second leg of the day would take us north along the coast to the city of Brisbane. The initial routing out of Maitland saw us following a railway line at 1,500ft, an established VFR corridor that keeps aircraft out of the airspace of Newcastle airport. After what felt like forever, being bumped around at low level, we were clear of the airspace and were able to begin a climb through the haze to smoother air.

Low level out of Albury
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The cockpit setup of the 206, "KFI"
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Visibility was still poor at times
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Now that we were in the clear, we set course for the city of Gold Coast. The flight continued over parched countryside and tinder-dry forests, until it was time to begin a descent to remain clear of Gold Coast airspace, and to join the low level corridor along the beach. We flew along the coast at 500 feet, past the skyscrapers and fun fair, enjoying fantastic views. North of the city we turned back inland, as it was just a short hop over to Archerfield, the general aviation airport serving Brisbane.

Approaching Gold Coast
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Gold Coast
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For a change, we chose the grass runway, 4R. The airport has a slightly strange set-up with two parallel tarmac runways, and two parallel grass runways. We parked at the end of a row of aircraft, next to a Beech Skipper that Ollie had previously ferried up to Archerfield for the new owner.

We ordered an “UberXL”, given that there were 4 of us plus bags, and were a little surprised when a standard Prius turned up. We managed to squeeze in anyway, and headed to the Adina Apartment Hotel where we met up with our fifth team-member, Hiyo, who’d arrived by bus earlier. Dinner that evening was at a pub a ten minute walk away, across the river; my brother’s attempt to have a light dinner by just ordering a starter and a salad was proven futile after the chicken wings he ordered unexpectedly turned out to be a 1kg platter. We retired to Rowan’s room for a quick drink, and then made our way to our respective beds.

Evening in Brisbane
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====================================================================

We met at 10, and walked to the Brisbane museum, located in part of the Brisbane City Hall. There was a small display of local artwork, and a little about the history of the city. It was quickly exhausted, but one could also take a self guided tour of the City Hall itself, including the very impressive central auditorium.

Sculpture in Brisbane
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Inside City Hall
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From here we walked towards the maritime museum, but were distracted along the way by a stall by the water offering a 90 minute river tour, leaving now. We jumped aboard and were treated to a run up and down the river, learning a lot more about the history of the city and enjoying the beautiful buildings along both banks.

Downtown Brisbane
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After this we spent an hour or so in the Queensland museum, most of which is free to visit. The three main exhibits covered tribal music, fauna of Queensland and the world (including dinosaurs), and a historical exhibition about the ANZAC forces, particularly around Gallipoli.

An aviation connection in the Brisbane Museum
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From here we returned to City Hall, for a tour of the bell tower which for many years was the tallest structure in Brisbane. After it was first built, demand from the citizens was so great that within a year regular tours were being taken up it.

We returned to the hotel for a rest, before a simple dinner at the nearby “Pancake Manor”. Drinks and snacks in one of our rooms finished off the evening, as we watched the light show projected on the bell tower.

Lots more pictures on the website at https://katamarino.co.uk/index.php/2020 ... ys-1-to-3/

Total flight hours so far: 176.4
Total distance so far: 20,320nm (37,633km)
Dave W, kanga, Rob L and 7 others liked this
#1744032
We woke just after 7, and all met in the lobby at 7:40. Our Uber gave us an inadvertent city tour on the way to the airport due to some navigational difficulties, but by 9am we were fueled and ready for departure. Our first flight of the day would be a 3 hour run; first to the coast at Bundaberg, followed by tracking the coastline up to Rockaway.

Loading up at Archerfield
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Departure
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Brisbane
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Things were still pretty hazy, but much better than they’d been 2 days before, and we could start to enjoy a bit of the view. It was mostly arid, forested country, looking like a prime target for any forest fire that might come through.

Approaching Rockhampton
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Queensland coast
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Descending into Rockhampton
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Final approach
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We stopped at Rockhampton to refuel and stretch our legs. Departure was on runway 33, pointed directly at the day’s final destination of Shute Harbour.

Refueling in Rockhampton
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Departure from Rockhampton
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North of Rockhampton conditions were good, albeit desolate. There was no sign of human impact for miles and miles, but every now and then you’d come across a massive mineral operation or similar. We cruised in the calm, cool air at 8,500.

The day's route
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Cruising along the coast
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Approaching the Whitsundays
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The Whitsundays
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Airlie Beach
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As we approached Shute Harbour, we made a long fast descent to a tight right downwind, flying a teardrop to turn around and fly an offset final approach to runway 14 – this is to avoid a house which is basically right on the threshold, and sensitive to overflying aircraft. They chose a strange place to live, if they don’t like aviation!

Landing at Shute Harbour
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Shute Harbour airport
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We were met by airport staff who kindly took our luggage away for us on a cart, and had a light lunch in the airport cafe before heading into town to our respective accommodation. After settling in we met for a swim at the pool complex near the beachfront, before a light Indian dinner and bed.

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It was an early start, with the bus collecting us just after 7am to take us to the “Derwent Hunter”, the sailing ship we’d spend the day on. This 90ft oak-built ship was constructed in Tasmania in 1946, over 18 months, by just 4 men. There were only 13 passengers against her maximum capacity of 39, so there was plenty of room for everyone to spread out. After a safety briefing we motored out of the harbour and headed west for a couple of hours, enjoying the views of the multitude of little islands that make up the Whitsunday area.

The Derwent Hunter
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We arrived at our first snorkeling area, and suited up. Rowan and I were very conscious about a news story we’d read, where 2 British men were mauled by sharks in this very area. “What are the chances of that happening again?” said Rowan. “That’s probably exactly what the second British man said”, I replied.

Rowan raises the sails
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Sting suits were mandatory to protect against jelly fish and none of us were stung. The water was a bit cloudy, and we didn’t see too much. A few solitary fish and plenty of coral was about it, and after an hour the dinghy was ferrying us back to the yacht.

Cruising the Whitsundays
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We snacked on fruit as the yacht repositioned to a second location, and were soon back in the water. The poor kid who’d been stung right at the start of the first session was promptly stung again. There was a bit more to see here, including a giant clam and a relaxed sea turtle, cruising around the area. I set out to swim to the beach, a surprisingly long way but just about made it back as the last of the snorkelers were being picked up. We were welcomed back on board and greeted with a delicious cold buffet of meats, cheeses, bread and fruits.

Heading back to harbour
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We munched away at this as we started motoring back towards Airlie Beach, soon hoisting the sails as the breeze had picked up. A couple of hours of relaxed sailing had us back at the dock. The next morning we’d be leaving our accommodations at 0500, so we all did our own things for a light dinner (mostly snacks from the supermarket), and were in bed by 8.
Dave W, mick w, Plan_B and 4 others liked this
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