Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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User avatar
By kanga
#1780137
Gertie wrote:.. If you care about not flying in a 737 MAX you check when booking. Substitutions of aircraft type do happen, but not all that often.


ISTR the great selling point of the Max to the airlines was to those already operating older 737s that crews would not need any retraining in the air (nor even much if any in the Sim, but only in the classroom) to add it to their existing Type Ratings. There were then, presumably, airlines currently operating only 737s, perhaps only newish ones like -800s, who had plans to operate only Maxs with their promised lower operating costs (a well-known Irish airline, who reportedly hired only those who already had 737 TRs ?); an aircraft substitution would presumably be most likely to another airframe of that airline and of same (sub)type. Therefore, one way to avoid Maxs would presumably be wholly to avoid such airlines. That would be easier for the prospective passenger to understand.
User avatar
By Rob P
#1780166
MODS! We really could do with a headline edit!
By avtur3
#1780220
Dave W wrote:@avtur3 could do that too. What do you want the title to say?


I see it has been edited, before I got chance to try.

Out of interest how does one do that please?

The only 'tool' I can see available is 'delete post'

Thanks
By avtur3
#1780221
Rob P wrote:MODS! We really could do with a headline edit!


In my defence 'your honour' the title seemed appropriate at the time.

Neither I nor anyone else could have predicted how the matter would unfold.

#tailbetweenlegs #I'vebeentold #musttryharder :lol:
kanga liked this
#1780259
It was indeed appropriate at the time.

But the shiver of seeing there'd been yet another one,... Then realisation dawned. Ah it's an old thread

Rob P
#1781071
Rob P wrote:Exhaustive testing prior to recertification

https://simpleflying.com/boeing-737-max ... ification/

Rob P


I'm not reading that specific page as it wants me to spend ten minutes selecting my cookie preferences, and life's too short.

But, I have been thinking exactly that. 10hrs over three days, and announcing that all of the flight testing has been done before any data has been analysed - in an aeroplane whose whole certification has been brought open to question, not just one single sub-system.

This just smacks of business as usual and FAA still being in Boeing's pocket.

G
Rob P liked this
#1786447
UK CAA may permit UK airspace flights "for the purposes of essential maintenance or modification". I'm guessing this may mean flights back to US, or to a Boeing-approved European maintenance centre, once a modification scheme has been approved in principle by FAA and EASA and/or CAA. For return to US, presumably RoI and Canada would also have to permit.

--------------------

"SD-2020/002: Boeing 737-8 "MAX" and Boeing 737-9 "MAX" Limitation of Operations due to a Fatal Accident in Ethiopia on 10 March 2019

This Safety Directive is made in the interests of continued safety of operation and to protect the public. It supersedes and replaces SD 2019/001, which is revoked, and introduces the possibility for managed ferry flights into, out of, or through UK airspace for the purposes of essential maintenance or modification.

http://publicapps.caa.co.uk/SD2020002 "
#1788255
Return to FAA Certification reportedly progressing; Gatwick may offer upgraded sims

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-53646442

I guess EASA/CAA will have to decide whether sim training will suffice for pilots who already have newer 737 TRs
#1798283
Surely the initial cause of this accident was not MCAS, but the crews failure to retard the thrust levers from TOGA power after take off, until they crashed. Obviously distracted by the erroneous stick shaker at lift off. But really basic airmanship should have kicked in.
Continuous Take Off power, and a light weight aircraft (short sector) is always going to end in tears.
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