Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By Josh
#1689474
The Times Magazine article making the same basic misunderstanding of the roots of the problem and reason for MCAS today :wall:
#1693553
For those of us who are still following the 737 Max saga, there appears to be little cause for optimism within Boeing and the FAA. This could well be their equivalent of Haddon-Cave, the wider review surrounding the RAF’s Nimrod crash in 2006. Importantly, the outcome may well reshape how regulators oversee all aspects of aviation activity. Indeed, we could see a return towards more hands-on and experienced oversight rather than the box-ticking process that has evolved over the past decade.
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By Rob P
#1693877
Graves was repeating the main points in a report written by two pilots at a major U.S. airline that pointed to pilot error as “the most consequential factor” in both crashes. Their report was commissioned and paid for by institutional investors with large holdings in Boeing stock


Nuff said?

But bloody hard on the crews involved; the guy really needs stringing up, but I guess he is in tune with the zeitgeist of Trump's America

Rob P
Flyin'Dutch', johnm liked this
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By eltonioni
#1694039
kanga wrote:All the fault of undertrained, unskilled, foreign pilots, says Congressman :roll:

https://www.seattletimes.com/business/b ... x-crashes/


Presumably another 'Merkin with a passport that's only got a Mexico stamp innit.

(These people have aircraft carriers, and jets, and rockets and other bangy stuff y'know)
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By PaulB
#1694042
Obviously, Boeing bears a lot of responsibility, and it is now facing numerous inquiries, including a criminal one. But the F.A.A. is also culpable, and not just for its hands-off approach during the certification process. After the Lion Air crash, it ordered airlines to change their safety manuals to include more information on the M.C.A.S., but it didn’t insist on Boeing installing an immediate fix to the system. Even after the Ethiopian Airlines crash, it allowed the 737 Max to keep flying until various foreign governments grounded it.


https://www.newyorker.com/news/our-colu ... nd-the-faa
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By kanga
#1694059
ISTR that after some crashes to USAF Academy Fireflies, Congress required the USAF not only to ground them but actually to scrap and crush them, sending results to landfill, rather than sell them. Some Congressmen insisted the fault had to be in the foreign design, it could not possibly be with the American pilots, despite the fact that many other Air Forces including the nearby RCAF were very happy with them. I've heard it's the only postwar USAF type of which not a single example has been preserved in an official USG Museum.

I rather doubt Congress will be requiring Boeing to crush all the Maxes .. :roll:
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