Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By johnm
#1686515
HHmmmm it will be interesting to see what the before and after scenarios on the MCAS software look like.....
By KeithM
#1686549
Could be a very expensive experience for Boeing.

As is already being said, even if they claim a fix, how long before the passengers will be convinced?

Maybe they could double the flight crews’ salaries and offer free flights to passengers for a couple of years?
#1686562
riverrock wrote:how many passengers know what sort of aircraft is flying them? How often do airlines change aircraft without telling passengers?


It can work the other way - if you had an Airbus fleet you'd be making it damned well known. Ryanair are all B737's aren't they?
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By KeithM
#1686571
eltonioni wrote:
riverrock wrote:how many passengers know what sort of aircraft is flying them? How often do airlines change aircraft without telling passengers?


It can work the other way - if you had an Airbus fleet you'd be making it damned well known. Ryanair are all B737's aren't they?


All is pretty academic, at present, while the Max is grounded, worldwide, in a blaze of bad publicity.

What happens when, or if, they are all cleared for flight remains to be seen and Boeing would seem to have a job on their hands to restore confidence and their reputation.

One might at least expect that passengers will perhaps be more vigilant than hitherto and somewhat reluctant to act as crash test dummies!
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By Rob L
#1686646
KingJames wrote:
kanga wrote:BBC News site gist:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-47812225

Similar smell to the Air France aircraft loss. Clearly lots to investigate but if completely true terrifying. Makes the pilots redundant.


I disagree, from what I saw on the BBC 6 o'clock news this evening. In that the Ethiopian Transport Minister reported that the pilots followed the QRH (or whatever) and the aircraft still crashed.

I believe the BEA have done the investigation on the FDR and CVR (I'm surprised they survived such an impact).

Rob
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By KingJames
#1686650
Similar smell to the Air France aircraft loss - faulty sensors

Clearly lots to investigate but if completely true terrifying - pilots follow the advice so different from air france

Makes the pilots redundant - did what they were meant to do and still no effect therefore might as well not have been there

I think we agree.
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By Josh
#1686652
For those interested, the preliminary report is here - it must have been a very noisy, challenging and physically demanding environment, with only 5 minutes to figure it out.

My personal nightmare is doing everything right in an aircraft and still not being able to get safely on the ground. Previously it was a Swissair type scenario but this would keep me awake at night if I were still flying the 737.
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By PaulB
#1686662
Thank you @Josh - I'd googled for that a couple of times earlier.
#1686702
Taking a step back from the detail, watching the BBC last night with no sound on, what struck me was that the plane just looks wrong. Interestingly my wife pointed it out as well and asked why the engines where positioned in that way.

Software fix to a hardware problem. Software is only as good as its input and all software has bugs, unforeseen design issues and the human interface is far more significant than people realise.

Military jets that are designed to be unstable have that instability running all the way through the design assumption - and the pilots have ejector seats.

At some point IMHO, somebody should have taken a step back from the design and given thought to whether they were having to try too hard to make those engines work with that airframe.

Reading the report this morning of the sensors disagreeing also reminded me of Dunkeswick. I’ve had multiple reasons to have taken a close interest in that one.
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