Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By KeithM
#1701318
Genghis the Engineer wrote:Sorry, I know it's the Mail, but...

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... HOURS.html

David Henderson's name was on a flight plan submitted to Nantes airport on Monday - the day of the journey - before it was cancelled and replaced with a second plan with David Ibbotson named as the pilot, officials have revealed.


Another source also claimed that Mr Henderson's passport was scanned at the airport on Monday, despite the experienced pilot categorically denying any involvement with Sala's flight.

Mr Henderson, 60, from York, told MailOnline he had not been in France, adding: 'I have not been to Nantes for one year.'


G


And there we go again!

I always thought that the phrase “premature ageing” was merely metaphorical.
By KeithM
#1701319
G-BLEW wrote:Quality writing from The Mail

Sala's flight went missing near Guernsey an hour after take off after ice either became clogged in the propeller or affecting the wings


I feel unlcean

Ian


And some quality spelling from the gaffer?

:)
G-BLEW liked this
#1712707
AAIB Special Bulletin out: https://www.gov.uk/aaib-reports/aaib-sp ... ibu-n264db

This Special Bulletin contains medical information relevant to the accident to highlight the implications of that information to the General Aviation community.


From the SB:

Toxicology tests on the blood of the passenger showed a carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb) saturation level of 58%. COHb is the combination product of carbon monoxide (CO) with haemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein molecule contained in red blood cells.

CO is a colourless, odourless gas produced from the incomplete combustion of carbon-containing materials. It readily combines with haemoglobin in the blood, decreasing the carriage of oxygen and causing a direct effect on the performance of those parts of the body which rely on oxygen for proper function. A COHb level of 50% or above in an otherwise healthy individual is generally considered to be potentially fatal.

In this type of aircraft, the cockpit is not separated from the cabin2 and it is considered likely that the pilot would also have been affected to some extent by exposure to CO.


COHb level over 50%: Seizure, unconsciousness, heart attack
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By Sooty25
#1712733
I suppose this now moves the direct blame from pilot error to mechanical defect.

Doesn't make the flight circumstances any more acceptable though.
By Chris Royle
#1712744
Perhaps this will encourage everyone to fit, at the very least, a 15 quid CO monitor from B and Q (even though it is said they are unsuitable for aircraft use....one of these probably saved the lives of a couple of my pilot chums) and to consign to the dustbin forever those silly cardboard thingies.
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