Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By rikur_
#1663599
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new- ... -of-drones

    police to be given additional powers to land, seize and search drones government to work on expanded use of technology to detect and repel drones in sites like airports and prisons exclusion zone extended around airports where drones are banned from flying from November 2019 drone operators will be required by law to register


We will therefore introduce additional 5km long by 1km width exclusion zones from runway ends, alongside an increase to the airport restriction out to the current Aerodrome Traffic Zone around airports (approximately a 5km radius circle)


giving the police the option to issue fixed penalty notices for minor drone offences, to ensure effective enforcement and an immediate deterrent to those who may misuse drones or attempt to break the law.


From 30th November 2019, before flying a drone of 250g-20kg in mass, the remote pilot will be required to obtain a valid acknowledgement of competency from the CAA. To obtain the acknowledgement of competency, remote pilots will have to pass an online test;
• As of 30th November 2019, before flying a drone of between 250g-20kg in mass, the remote pilot must ensure the small drone operator's registration number is affixed onto the drone and that the operator has a valid certificate of registration.
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By chevvron
#1663613
Gertie wrote:So? Why would anyone who breaks the existing laws care about new ones?

True there's thousands of them out there already and the operators will all say 'we didn't know about new laws' but at least it's better than it was.
Can you imagine a 6 year old kid taking a competency test before he/she can fly their new toy though?
By Crash one
#1663614
Can a kid buy a drone without doing the test first?
Do drone sellers have to register who bought what to the police, like guns (Registered Firearms Dealer)?
If not what’s the point.
By chevvron
#1663618
Parents buy their kids airguns blatantly ignoring the fact that anyone under 14 using one must be supervised by a person over the age of 21.
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By JAFO
#1663626
Gertie wrote:So? Why would anyone who breaks the existing laws care about new ones?


HenryII wrote:What miserable drones and traitors have I nurtured and promoted in my household who let their lord be treated with such shameful contempt?


Gertie is spot on, those who might have previously misused drones for nefarious ends will still use drones for nefarious ends. If I do no more than search for drone on eBay, I get 44,279 choices; quadcopter gives me 29,621. Are any of those sellers going to insist to see my registration and proof of competence? And that's if I don't just buy the parts and make my own. Is this really going to stop people buying drones or building drones and operating them in pretty much any way they choose?
By Crash one
#1663697
The law as it stands is quite adequate, perhaps with the addition of the extended glide path exclusion.
If the penalty for breaking the law around airfields was a lot stiffer, instant jail for six months or more it may be a deterrent. Otherwise kids and law breakers are just going to laugh at it.
How you educate them is another matter.
I watched a presentation from a responsible drone owner just last night.
It had his name and two phone numbers printed on the drone casing.
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By Dave W
#1663704
chevvron wrote:Parents buy their kids airguns blatantly ignoring the fact that anyone under 14 using one must be supervised by a person over the age of 21.

Furthering the thread drift, but that's not correct.
Ask The Police wrote:A person aged 14 –17 may borrow an air gun from a person aged 18 or over and use it on private property without supervision.

The problem with the scenario described is not the supervision, it is the gifting in the first place - which is why the gun is typically officially their Dad's:
Ask The Police wrote:It is an offence for a person under the age of 18 to purchase or hire an air weapon or ammunition or for someone to make them a gift of an air weapon or ammunition.

My bold.
By RayP
#1663785
Back on topic...
It will be interesting to see their definition of "drone"
Will it apply to all remote controlled flying machines? I can see lots of RC plane flyers getting upset if it does.
Or maybe it will only apply to FPV drones? What about automonmous drones with a pre-set flight path?
By chevvron
#1663786
RayP wrote:What about automonmous drones with a pre-set flight path?

Eh??
Anyway to get back to my original point, my analogy with airgun useage.
Parents buy their kids airguns and irrespective of whether they are under 14, allow them to fire the gun where and when they like without supervision, so I can see a similar situation occuring with drones weighing in excess of 250gm
Last edited by chevvron on Tue Jan 08, 2019 5:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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By Flyin'Dutch'
#1663801
Grandstanding

As someone wrote above - operating near aerodromes was already against the law.

The problem is that the enforcement people have nothing in their armoury and skill set which enables them to enforce the law.

We had the news that Gatwick spent £5M on equipment, we don't know what it is as that's a secret, no doubt so the perpetrators can't prepare to evade it.

Yah yah.

I just think they don't want to show their potato shooter.

If they had effective deterrents they would be keen to display that capability. If for no other reason than to dissuade would be offenders.

And if indeed this enforcement tool is effective why did they have to wait until the events in December occurred; it is not as if nuisance drone flying has just been invented.

They really are asleep at the wheel.
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By rikur_
#1663806
RayP wrote:Back on topic...
It will be interesting to see their definition of "drone"
Will it apply to all remote controlled flying machines? I can see lots of RC plane flyers getting upset if it does.
Or maybe it will only apply to FPV drones? What about automonmous drones with a pre-set flight path?

It's defined in the legislation. It does include RC planes, but there's an exemption of sorts:
• Members of:
─ The Society of Model Aeronautical Engineers trading as the British Model
Flying Association (BMFA);
─ The Scottish Aeromodellers Association (SAA);
─ The Large Model Association (LMA); and
─ FPV UK
may operate a small unmanned aircraft of a weight below 7kg in excess of 400
feet above the surface, subject to the conditions laid out by the CAA ....
• Members of the above list of associations are exempt from the requirement to
ensure that direct unaided visual contact is maintained with the aircraft provided
the SUA does not exceed 3.5kg, at heights lower than 1000ft and that first person
view is maintained.