Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
#1655302
Flight Radar 24 (other spotter sites avail) has some huge low level gaps in coverage. Parts of the SE especially.

I offered to host a receiver but was told there was no need.
If he's got a transponder then he has to operate it, no matter what airspace he's in.....

The point here I believe is that it's Glass G hence a 'should' not a 'must'.
#1655328
CloudHound wrote:I offered to host a receiver but was told there was no need.


You don't need to ask. Just put one together yourself with a Raspberry Pi and an SDR dongle. You can use a Pi Zero W, and have the whole shebang up and running for under 20 quid. I have two stations, one in Guildford, one in Wales.

CloudHound wrote:
If he's got a transponder then he has to operate it, no matter what airspace he's in.....

The point here I believe is that it's Glass G hence a 'should' not a 'must'.


I thought SERA = must?
PaulSS liked this
User avatar
By Dave W
#1655332
You're right, Paul. The regulation is explicit that it applies everywhere (My bold).
SERA.13001 Operation of an SSR transponder
(a) When an aircraft carries a serviceable SSR transponder, the pilot shall operate the transponder at all times during flight, regardless of whether the aircraft is within or outside airspace where SSR is used for ATS purposes.
Flyin'Dutch' liked this
#1655341
Flyin'Dutch' wrote:
proteus wrote:As it's a helicopter, if he's operating within the curtilage of his property the 28day planning change of use does not apply.

Neither will movement numbers.


Out of curiosity what does that mean in practice?


If he's within his garden he can come and go as much as he likes. He does not need change of use planning permission as would be needed for a field. Or a certificate of lawful use. The 28 day rule as mentioned applies to agricultural fields and change of use. Often people operate their helicopters within their garden so the 28 day rule does not apply.

The same would apply to fixed wing if one had a large enough garden.

The OP question was about limitations in the numbers of take off / landings.
Flyin'Dutch' liked this
#1655429
Gertie wrote:Proteus may or may not be right - haven't a clue - but he's used the magic word "curtilage" which nobody except expert planning lawyers is likely to interpret correctly.


Indeed so. The phrases 'curtilage of the property' and 'open land' in the BHA guidelines would have property lawyers rubbing their hands in glee. I think they probably mean 'domestic curtilage' and 'agricultural land' but even then there's any amount of debate to be had about the definition of those terms. The curtilage of a farm, for example, is the farm. Its domestic curtilage is (probably) just its garden.
#1655438
So to summarise:
- Helicopter from garden: entirely legal, can come and go as often as pleases.
- Must use a transponder if he has one.
- No way for you to confirm whether he is using a transponder, unless you are another aircraft with TCAS (and are flying) or you have a secondary radar handy within line of sight (both of which the transponder would reply to). You might be able to positively confirm (but lack of receipt doesn't prove he has it turned off) if you receive an ADS-B signal from him (via some sort of ground station) when in line of site of one (such as FR24 or your own SDR dongle).
Ben K liked this
User avatar
By Dave W
#1655442
Additionally, if you have a device capable of detecting bearlingless signals (PilotAware, SkyEcho...), you can tell that a particular nearby aircraft is transponding Mode S, and approximately how close it is. You just don't know in which direction. (But you'll know relative altitude).
User avatar
By Dave W
#1655446
plus7g wrote:Are we actually discussing how one reports a fellow aviator for not using his transponder correctly based on phone apps like FR24 and similar ?? WTF ? :(


Not so far as I can see. What leads you to that conclusion?

You're the only one that's mentioned "reporting" people.
By plus7g
#1655447
CloudHound wrote:Flight Radar 24 (other spotter sites avail) has some huge low level gaps in coverage. Parts of the SE especially.

I offered to host a receiver but was told there was no need.
If he's got a transponder then he has to operate it, no matter what airspace he's in.....

The point here I believe is that it's Glass G hence a 'should' not a 'must'.


Dave W wrote:Additionally, if you have a device capable of detecting bearlingless signals (PilotAware, SkyEcho...), you can tell that a particular nearby aircraft is transponding Mode S, and approximately how close it is. You just don't know in which direction. (But you'll know relative altitude).


Paul_Sengupta wrote:
CloudHound wrote:I offered to host a receiver but was told there was no need.


You don't need to ask. Just put one together yourself with a Raspberry Pi and an SDR dongle. You can use a Pi Zero W, and have the whole shebang up and running for under 20 quid. I have two stations, one in Guildford, one in Wales.

CloudHound wrote:
If he's got a transponder then he has to operate it, no matter what airspace he's in.....

The point here I believe is that it's Glass G hence a 'should' not a 'must'.


I thought SERA = must?

" when in line of site of one (such as FR24 or your own SDR dongle)."
By proteus
#1655453
Gustosomerset wrote:
Gertie wrote:Proteus may or may not be right - haven't a clue - but he's used the magic word "curtilage" which nobody except expert planning lawyers is likely to interpret correctly.


Indeed so. The phrases 'curtilage of the property' and 'open land' in the BHA guidelines would have property lawyers rubbing their hands in glee. I think they probably mean 'domestic curtilage' and 'agricultural land' but even then there's any amount of debate to be had about the definition of those terms. The curtilage of a farm, for example, is the farm. Its domestic curtilage is (probably) just its garden.


My interpretation which may not be correct is that it is domestic curtilage associated with the dwelling rather than outside boundaries or fields. And that the use would be part of your entitlement to enjoy your dwelling . Much as you can come and go in your car as much as you like and the 28 day rule does not apply.

I know nothing about this chap but being able to fly from your home has got to be something to aspire to rather than denigrate.