Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
  • 1
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
#1694595
Just checking in on this, and adding +1 for the 'wait and see'.

At the moment, there is a very real possibility of no Brexit at all (let alone a Brexit that fudges 'no change apart from name').
User avatar
By G-BLEW
#1694606
At the moment, there is a very real possibility of no Brexit at all (let alone a Brexit that fudges 'no change apart from name').


I would say that there's a not insignificant chance of a no deal Brexit as the Conservative Party will almost certainly be electing a new leader.

Ian
johnm, flybymike, A le Ron liked this
User avatar
By PaulB
#1694610
Deal or no deal, it seems like membership of EASA is either EU members or members of ETFA. We're not likely to be either......

EASA isn't optimistic.....

As the withdrawal and transitional agreement negotiations are currently underway EASA cannot yet determine the ultimate impact of the withdrawal on EASA or its stakeholders within the EU-27 and 4 associated countries or within the UK. The withdrawal will significantly alter EASA’s cooperation with UK authorities and will not leave EASA’s stakeholders untouched.


https://www.easa.europa.eu/brexit
User avatar
By SteveC
#1694667
Alas the isolationist rationale that got us into this situation will come back and bite the smug in the ass later when they are not able to fly their EASA aircraft off fraggle rock into Europe. Its Ok if you are a flying farmer from some illustrious little strip in the middle of nowhere whose idea of flying is going to the next farm or if feeling really brave taking your flip flops over to one of the "big" airports for a burger. But for those who fly wider and for those of us flying for a living this is a monumental pain in the ass. End result for all of our pilots is to be moving our licences to a friendly EU country to maintain our current privileges. Massive loss to the UK..... Interesting out of an active register of 55,000 pilots over 1/4 have now moved to EU states. I guess the CAA will be able to concentrate very fully on PPL flyers in the UK in future as they will have no other job..........
QSD, derekf, Neil MacG and 4 others liked this
#1694672
If there is no deal then we are, aviation wise, snookered for sure, in a big way, big time.

It may not take long to get from No Deal to a A Deal in relation to aviation but that will cause some serious damage.

And anyone who thinks that Airbus et al will stay in the UK will be in for a nasty surprise. No sensible business will build on quicksand.
TouringTuggy, Stu B, derekf and 3 others liked this
User avatar
By Neil MacG
#1694687
I have to agree with SteveC in his concern about the isolationist position.

As an NPPL(SSEA) holder it was great to upgrade to an EASA LAPL(A) and be able to extend my flying to outside the UK at a modest cost and with very little administrative overhead.

As I see it this privilege will be wiped out as a result of Brexit and if I want to enjoy the options to fly to France I will need to pay for the upgrade to an ICAO recognised licence along with the medical which will go with it.

I can't see EASA making a special exemption for a non ICAO licence from a country that has effectively rejected EASA - even if it was largely based around the way the UK introduced the NPPL licence in the first place.

I'll probably continue to fly in the UK but it won't be with a smug face.
User avatar
By gaznav
#1694695
If the Bahamas can have their own Civil Aviation Authority that meets ICAO, then I’m sure the UK can. :lol:

Anyway, leave/remain/a-bit-of-both (delete as applicable) just get on with it and let’s start to focus on the more important things that are starting to confront us - global warming, the fight for the last of the natural resources, global immigration, rogue states and extremism.
User avatar
By Dusty_B
#1694704
But LAPLs are not ICAO compliant licenses, so LAPL holders - irrespective of whether the CAA can maintain its ‘competent authority’ status - will no longer be able to just hop across the channel.
By ak7274
#1694709
I would imagine the same will work the other way and a LAPL won't be valid from the EU into the UK?
There is going to be some big changes either way, but as our government has already said they will accept EASA into the UK without a reciprocal agreement, we are already in the doo doo.
#1694728
If the Bahamas can have their own Civil Aviation Authority that meets ICAO, then I’m sure the UK can. :lol:

Don’t forget the original UK CAA licence is full ICAO.
I still have mine, and doubtless an ab initio or conversion reintroduction would be no problem.
gaznav liked this
  • 1
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12