Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.

Have you ever had an engine failure in an SEP?

Yes, total
32
21%
Yes, partial
43
29%
No, never
75
50%
By GingerFI
#1519815
One full failure in an SEP, it was an ancient arrow 1 and it stopped just before the flare so no real dramas. Although I've also had one stop due to running a tank dry.....whoops but switch tanks and all was well.

Several rough runnings due to fouled plugs, dodgy mixture controls, overheating etc.

And one failure in a fully loaded twin that decided to spit all of its oil all over the shop. Although I've shut down more than a handful more engines on a twin while teaching the MEP course, but that doesn't really count as it was fully intentional.
By Paultheparaglider
#1519839
Groundspeed wrote:Did you retain the prop on your gearbox failure Paul? An instructor, flying a Shadow, that I knew had his prop depart when his gearbox failed.


Fortunately, yes, Groundspeed. It was extremely frustrating to have the engine running perfectly, but a windmilling prop with no drive to it.
By Paultheparaglider
#1519840
flybymike wrote:
Rocker broke on 4 stroke twin. Ended up on Roedean hockey pitches.


I can think of worse places to force land.....


Not only did I have the bad luck to have a rocker break, Mike, I also had the bad luck to have it happen during term break. :lol:
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By Grumpy One
#1519864
GrahamB wrote:
Grumpy One wrote:0 x engine failures in about 4500hrs SEP fixed wing flying. :thumleft:


Cough...... :wink:

Wozza matta GB? Gotta coff? :clown:
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By Bert Presley
#1520007
Lockhaven wrote:1 x partial failure over water with a failed cylinder, it kept running for over 2 hours until I reached land.


Two hours? Crivvens. Your nerves must have been fried to a crisp.
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By Lockhaven
#1520078
Bert Presley wrote:
Lockhaven wrote:1 x partial failure over water with a failed cylinder, it kept running for over 2 hours until I reached land.


Two hours? Crivvens. Your nerves must have been fried to a crisp.


There was a hole chewed in the seat :lol: especially as it was a flight in the winter flying between Canada and Greenland :pale:
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By Dave_Ett
#1520382
I have to say I'm now more worried about engine failures than I was before this thread. More than 50% have suffered partial or full failure. OK they lived to tell us about it, but even so!

Are there some common factors here, like engine type? Is there a database showing which engine is the most reliable?
By malcolmfrost
#1520388
Dave_Ett wrote:I have to say I'm now more worried about engine failures than I was before this thread. More than 50% have suffered partial or full failure. OK they lived to tell us about it, but even so!

Are there some common factors here, like engine type? Is there a database showing which engine is the most reliable?

I have to hold my hands up and say it's probably down to my inexpert design of the poll. It doesn't take into account the failures per hour flown, which my gut feeling says is much lower.
The AAIB reports are probably more indicative.
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/air-accident-monthly-bulletins#2016-monthly-bulletins
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By dont overfill
#1520394
I stated no engine failures. That was over around 1500 hours behind mostly Lycomings and Continentals.
I did however suffer a cracked spinner backplate in an AA5 which caused some vibration and a burning smell as the spinner chewed a gouge in the cowling.
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By Paul_Sengupta
#1520397
Dave_Ett wrote:Are there some common factors here, like engine type? Is there a database showing which engine is the most reliable?


You may find that the minority are to do with the engine itself, it may be external factors that cause the majority of failures. I didn't put down a "partial" but I once had a carb heat cable break on me in the Florida heat on a PFL where it took a bit to establish a climb. Not specifically to do with the engine, that one, and there are perhaps many like this with hoses coming off, fuel systems having problems, icing, prop governor failures, etc, etc. We had one engine failure in Florida where a bird hit the PA28 just at the top of the nose leg...and took out the gascolator in the process. The engine stopped as there was no longer any fuel available.

There are people here to test fly aeroplanes, and also fly unknown aircraft on a routine basis (e.g. ferry pilots). There are people who date back to the dawn of microlight flying. There are those who fly or have flown behind older two strokes. They will skew the figures.