Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
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By A4 Pacific
#1846995
Not quite. TCAS Resolution Advisories (RAs) are ordinarily disabled on retractable types when the gear is extended and/or when below 1000 feet IIRC. This eliminates nuisance RAs under such circumstances, but doesn't suppress TCAS entirely.


It’s also the case that at some airports, particularly in the US, when flying simultaneous parallel approaches to closely spaced runways, pilots will select “TA Only” to mute ‘nuisance’ RAs.

It may even be an SOP for some operators. It’s just never been mine! :shock:
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By Cub
#1847012
A4 Pacific wrote:It’s also the case that at some airports, particularly in the US, when flying simultaneous parallel approaches to closely spaced runways, pilots will select “TA Only” to mute ‘nuisance’ RAs.


I suspect, not for much longer!
By Ibra
#1847024
I did read that SR22 was flying at 800ft agl 3nm from threshold (maybe at 160kias), is this now the typical VFR circuit? it's too shallow and too fast, not a healthy when mixing with heavy metal, if you don't get run by heavy airframes on 3deg ILS, their wake turbulence will descend to you

I would be at 2500ft agl at 3nm final or 1000ft agl at 1nm when VFR, just like the Cub keep it tight & slow & steep & short and you will not expose yourself to 3deg slope IFR predators !

PS: not to be a liar but I may have been at 800ft agl at 4nm but it was probably in Astir glider on final at 6pm
By Vtr1000
#1847032
Looking at other contributors on this it appears the Metroliner operator operates these single pilot, as freight operations. Also apparently no autopilot so your manual handling skills are well polished..
By Rallye
#1847035
James Chan wrote:
where it is perfectly acceptable


And that's great as it means one less switch for the pilot to change. But do you know if that's the same for flights across Europe?

When I was taught my PPL back in the day, I was told to only switch to ALT when holding short of the runway, and then back to GND when crossing the hold lines coming off the runway.


I think there is a rule in Europe that says that you have to put your transponder mode S on as soon you are taxying. But not sure
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By Rob P
#1847056
GND?

I don't appear to have one of those.

Rob P
#1847065
Ibra wrote:I did read that SR22 was flying at 800ft agl 3nm from threshold (maybe at 160kias), is this now the typical VFR circuit? it's too shallow and too fast, not a healthy when mixing with heavy metal, if you don't get run by heavy airframes on 3deg ILS, their wake turbulence will descend to you

I would be at 2500ft agl at 3nm final or 1000ft agl at 1nm when VFR, just like the Cub keep it tight & slow & steep & short and you will not expose yourself to 3deg slope IFR predators !

PS: not to be a liar but I may have been at 800ft agl at 4nm but it was probably in Astir glider on final at 6pm


I agree that 800ft AGL at 3NM is too shallow, and 160Kts too fast but when I see your figures. what descent angle are you flying?

I know from my home base we turn base to final around some silos which are approx 1.4NM from the threshold (based on ground track) and we're typically 800feet AGL when we turn. That gives, if my math is correct, around a 5° descent angle which seems reasonable. Your figures would suggest anywhere between a 7.6 and 9.8° angle - maybe this is ok for your aircraft but I've never seen any Cirrus flying such an approach, none of the CSIPs I've flown with have ever proposed such approaches either......
By Ibra
#1847098
Full Metal Jackass wrote:
I agree that 800ft AGL at 3NM is too shallow, and 160Kts too fast but when I see your figures. what descent angle are you flying?

I know from my home base we turn base to final around some silos which are approx 1.4NM from the threshold (based on ground track) and we're typically 800feet AGL when we turn. That gives, if my math is correct, around a 5° descent angle which seems reasonable. Your figures would suggest anywhere between a 7.6 and 9.8° angle - maybe this is ok for your aircraft but I've never seen any Cirrus flying such an approach, none of the CSIPs I've flown with have ever proposed such approaches either......


Same I would be about 4.5deg in Cirrus or similar touring aitcraft, maybe 5deg with wind, the figure 1000ft/1nm I quote was for Cub circuit but I just want to highlight that one would never fly 2.5deg slopes VFR it's just not efficient and does not leave room for engine failures (even on chute one needs 400ft agl if power cuts on final), such slope from 3nm will need lot of power and "one hour of flying" with risks of getting hit by masts, gusts, birds, wake, traffic, noise complains...

I fly 3deg when IFR but it's stay low & fast and hope for the best :lol:
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By PeteSpencer
#1847105
Some of the most bum tweaking flying I’ve ever done was during FAA/IR training at Naples FL: bad weather circuits galore then hauling it in for miles at 3 degrees over the densely populated city back yards with absolutely nowhere to go in the case of an undonk. :wink:

Sharing the circuit with a Mitchell made up for it , though .
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By skydriller
#1847113
James Chan wrote:When I was taught my PPL back in the day, I was told to only switch to ALT when holding short of the runway, and then back to GND when crossing the hold lines coming off the runway.


That is exactly what I have been told too, for the reasons I said in my other post. I seem to recall that the pre-modeS transponders had Off-Stdby-On-Alt with 4x rotary digit selection and I was also taught to switch to stdby when changing squawk.

Im glad this thread has drifted to Transponders & TCAS operation, it has broadened my understanding of how things work and what we should br doing.

Regards, SD..

Edit : Will this mid-air perhaps mean that TCAS operation might change wrt the warning inhibition aspect @2Donkeys and others mentioned?
By IMCR
#1847116
The SR22 in which I have around 1,500 hours is reasonably slippery. It will turn on a dime, but the tendency if you are not familiar with type is probably to slow down the turn quite considerably, especially if turning on to a relatively short final for fear of the aircraft speed getting away with you on final, which it will do, especially as in this case the aircraft was already fast. The key training lesson is that if you want to play around with tight circuits hitting the speeds at each of the turns is crucial because hot and high does not work.
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By Trent772
#1847119
Couple of interesting ones out overnight.

The second one is by the guy in the 172 who was on his 1st solo. There were 2 guys in the Cirrus !

The 1st solo guy showed incredible calmness :thumleft:




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By Jonzarno
#1847120
One thing that makes a difference to how effectively you can shed speed on the Cirrus is which prop you have.

The Hartzell composite has a much bigger braking effect than the equivalent metal prop, and the MT four blade I have is also better for that.
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