Primarily for general aviation discussion, but other aviation topics are also welcome.
By johnm
#1617591
Potentially anything with a G on the side not flying within the boundaries of the UK as there'll be no mechanism for approving its maintenance regime that is recognised by other states and insurance may therefore become an issue.

It's not hard to solve, it just needs doing......like setting up the M reg or the 2 Reg
#1617594
johnm wrote:Potentially anything with a G on the side not flying within the boundaries of the UK as there'll be no mechanism for approving its maintenance regime that is recognised by other states and insurance may therefore become an issue.


Anything flying with a G on the side that is not Annex II? The EASA notice to stakeholders (13 April 2018) says ARCs, C of A's, etc will not be valid after withdrawl so how can an aircraft with an EASA C of A and ARC fly inside the UK and how can a pilot with an EASA licence fly it??

CAA have said they are not planning for this so expect that everything will be grounded.
By map5623
#1617602
how can a pilot with an EASA licence fly it?
Issued by the CAA, and as far as I am aware is an internation license NOT and EU licence, so what would be the problem, or will the air density change after Brexit?
By johnm
#1617628
map5623 wrote:how can a pilot with an EASA licence fly it?
Issued by the CAA, and as far as I am aware is an internation license NOT and EU licence, so what would be the problem, or will the air density change after Brexit?


The CAA's authority to issue EASA licences will cease and become invalid, therefore so will the licences. Annexe II is an EASA construct so what the status of such would be is not entirely clear. The CAA can do what it likes within the confines of the UK, but AFAIC if I can only fly within the UK I'll go by car, if there's any fuel.....

As I said earlier most of these things are relatively easy to sort out, but doing so requires some practical work and a signed agreement/treaty.
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By UpThere
#1617652
This from the government's hot-from-the-press position paper on aviation:
If we agree that the UK should continue to participate in an EU agency [EASA], the UK would have to respect the remit of the ECJ in that regard, and make an appropriate financial contribution.

A statement of the bleeding obvious, but impossible due to their red lines!

Meanwhile, the EU have spelled out in detail the implications for aviation of Brexit:

WITHDRAWAL OF THE UNITED KINGDOM AND EU AVIATION SAFETY RULES

Certificates issued before the withdrawal date by the competent authorities of the United Kingdom on the basis of the provisions of the Basic Regulation and its implementing rules will no longer be valid as of the withdrawal date in the EU. This concerns in particular:
...
Pilot licences, pilot medical certificates, certificates for pilot training organisations, certificates for aero-medical centres, certificates for flight simulation training devices, certificates for persons responsible for providing flight training, flight simulation training or assessing pilots' skill, and certificates for aeromedical examiners, issued pursuant to Article 7 of the Basic Regulation.


Tick tock ...
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By Sooty25
#1617690
Okay, let me re-phrase based on the earlier quoted extract

“The impact of Brexit on aviation is not isolated to UK companies, it falls on the European aerospace industry as a whole.”


What effect will this have on other non UK nations, the aircraft they operate and their current reliance on UK service providers? If we crash out who else does it screw up?
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By UpThere
#1617708
Cessna57 wrote:Can everyone just relax, as my Brexiteer mate said, 350m a WEEK buys enough civil servants to sort this all out, with some left over for the NHS and to fix all the roads as well.

The problem is, sorting it out not up to civil servants, and our politicians are spending more time arguing among themselves about what sort of Brexit they want, rather than negotiating with the EU. Meanwhile, the social and economic conditions which resulted in Brexit (and have nothing to do with our membership of the EU) are not being addressed at all.

Given the stated legal effect on licensing of crashing out of the EU, as quoted in my previous post, I cannot understand how any pilot can support the demands of the extreme Brexiteers.
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By johnm
#1617710
Sooty25 wrote:Okay, let me re-phrase based on the earlier quoted extract

“The impact of Brexit on aviation is not isolated to UK companies, it falls on the European aerospace industry as a whole.”


What effect will this have on other non UK nations, the aircraft they operate and their current reliance on UK service providers? If we crash out who else does it screw up?

Basically anyone who buys aerospace bits from the U.K. Any airline that flies into or via the U.K.
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By akg1486
#1617733
Forgive me for what is perhaps a stupid question, but why now? Why not a long time ago? And why does the CAA need external prompting from the industry to start talking Brexit with EASA? :scratch:
By johnm
#1617744
akg1486 wrote:Forgive me for what is perhaps a stupid question, but why now? Why not a long time ago? And why does the CAA need external prompting from the industry to start talking Brexit with EASA? :scratch:


Why now and not a long time ago is because industry suddenly begins to believe that the loonies running the negotiations might not get round to a sensible deal in time.

Because the CAA has also assumed that staying in EASA was a no brainer.
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By Gertie
#1617745
Sooty25 wrote:maybe,

“The impact of Brexit on aviation is not isolated to UK companies, it falls on the European aerospace industry as a whole.”


might just make Barnier realise that the 27 might need to compromise

The "compromise" appears to be that EU27 are looking elsewhere than the UK for parts suppliers whilst UK companies try to retain business by looking to move work abroad.